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Thread: Choosing the right Adams model with a bass bone background

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelSchott View Post
    Itís .6 on what they call the Select model which to me means the non-custom version. You have the option to choose from .5 to .7 on the E1. The E3 also offers various metal thicknesses. My E3 is .6.
    Hmm. So as the thickness increases from .5 to .7, what happens to how the instrument sounds/plays?

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    As said above, the E1 & E3 Custom series offer metal thickness options. The E2 is only offered in .80 as far as I know. But when you get into "Custom" all kinds of things can happen! For example, British artist Gary Curtin has an E1 with .80 metal and a heavy valve block (like the E2 uses):

    Attachment 10620

    If I had to guess, I'd say that the British Bessons were around the .80 thickness.
    Yes, I just looked it up. My 1995 Satin finished Besson has a 12" bell and .80 gauge thickness, which I use in band. So, I am looking at finding a lighter instrument to play solos on. I played the Adams E1 standard model - .6 gauge. Found it to be lighter to hold, easier to play, and has a sound that for me is more brilliant, sonorous, and joyful. So the metal gage has a lot to do with that, eh? Next question, does finish affect the sound? Adams has several to choose from.
    The University of Missouri "University Band"
    Columbia Community Band, Columbia MO

    Trombones:
    Shires .525 medium bore
    Conn 6H

    Euphonium:
    Besson Sovereign 967 Satin finish (1995)

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    Hmm. So as the thickness increases from .5 to .7, what happens to how the instrument sounds/plays?
    To my ears, the sound becomes a bit deeper as the metal gets thicker, and it will be able to accept a harder "blow" when you are really pushing. But the thinner metal feels more responsive and may sound that way. Miel Adams listened to my play an E1/sterling .55 and an E1/sterling .60. He preferred the .55 for its more musical sound. I preferred the .60 for its projection and volume handling. Between those 2 the differences were minor; it is more dramatic when you compare a 60 to an 80, for example.

    The various finishes have a smaller effect. To my ears, a lacquered horn is a teensy bit smoother or mellower compared to silver plate (I think the lacquer is slightly thicker). If the antique finish adds thickness (which I think it might) then it would be in the lacquer+ category.

    Different materials also come into play. A gold brass horn has a bit richer sound to me (a bit more "color" in the sound). The sterling silver bell adds more tonal range in both directions for an advanced player (some days I can leverage it; some days I can't, depending on my overall chopular condition, I suppose). A sterling silver leadpipe mellows the sound a bit, and should/does have less clear articulations.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    To my ears, the sound becomes a bit deeper as the metal gets thicker, and it will be able to accept a harder "blow" when you are really pushing. But the thinner metal feels more responsive and may sound that way. Miel Adams listened to my play an E1/sterling .55 and an E1/sterling .60. He preferred the .55 for its more musical sound. I preferred the .60 for its projection and volume handling. Between those 2 the differences were minor; it is more dramatic when you compare a 60 to an 80, for example.

    The various finishes have a smaller effect. To my ears, a lacquered horn is a teensy bit smoother or mellower compared to silver plate (I think the lacquer is slightly thicker). If the antique finish adds thickness (which I think it might) then it would be in the lacquer+ category.

    Different materials also come into play. A gold brass horn has a bit richer sound to me (a bit more "color" in the sound). The sterling silver bell adds more tonal range in both directions for an advanced player (some days I can leverage it; some days I can't, depending on my overall chopular condition, I suppose). A sterling silver leadpipe mellows the sound a bit, and should/does have less clear articulations.
    Thank you so much! All that now makes sense. Don't get me wrong, I love the Besson, but it's a bit of a tank to hold and manage for me. I read that you like the E3 because of its projection when soloing in front of a concert band. That makes sense to me now. I appreciate your help. I'm an advanced player, but not a pro like you. I have discerning ears, but the audience doesn't. I guess I will choose the model which gives me the most joy to play and that can transfer that joy to the audience.
    The University of Missouri "University Band"
    Columbia Community Band, Columbia MO

    Trombones:
    Shires .525 medium bore
    Conn 6H

    Euphonium:
    Besson Sovereign 967 Satin finish (1995)

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Sacramento, CA area
    Posts
    302
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    I guess I will choose the model which gives me the most joy to play and that can transfer that joy to the audience.
    Sorry to go off topic, but THIS! Yes, that is the way to go. Joy feeds the soul. Music can feed joy. So as a musician, find the instrument that feeds that joy for both you and your audience. Your joy in playing will feed the audience's joy in hearing. You have the right of it and sound like you are ready to choose. Feed JOY :-) !

    - Sara
    Baritone - 3 Valve, Compensating, JinBao JBBR1240

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