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Thread: Sinfonico Reviews- a request..

  1. #1

    Sinfonico Reviews- a request..

    Ive been really interested in all the well done reviews on the Wessex Sinfonico. I would like to ask if someone could post a photo of themselves holding the instrument while seated.

    It sounds as though this instrument might be a good choice for some of us with ergonomic challenges and it would be helpful to see where the horn fits on or above the lap and in the arms.

    Thank you to anyone who is able and willing to do this!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I'll be posting my review SUNDAY & will do as you ask!
    Jim
    Last edited by Snorlax; 06-27-2021 at 12:04 PM.
    Jim Williams N9EJR (love 10 meters)
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  3. #3
    https://youtu.be/qSEJXsWVzEM Besson Imperial 80s

    Vs

    https://youtu.be/qSEJXsWVzEM Wessex Sinfonico

    Apologies for the shoddy playing, not anywhere close to back in shape playing wise…

    Hopefully you can see how the Sinfonico fits nicely on the leg, I am not a tall person, so your body would factor into how it is held more than the instrument itself.

    If there are any differences in the holding of either instrument, I am not aware of them.

    The Sinfonico is lighter, noticeable, but not by that much, but for any marching or standing performing that difference would help endurance wise.

    The Stirling virtuoso and Besson prestige are wider instruments if memory serves, I am sure others with more recent experience can confirm or refute that.

    Hope that helps.

  4. #4
    Thank you so much for both of your posts. I enjoyed reading them and listening to them, and the photos are quite helpful. I thought your tone on the Sinfonico seemed a little bit more “finished” than the Besson, but it might have been because it was the second recording. I intend to listen to them again a little later.

    I’ve dealt with problems with arms and fingers since beginning euphonium lessons 2 years ago, having given up woodwinds because of arthritic fingers. I see the Sinfonico as a possibility.

    Are you working with a teacher?

  5. #5
    When I was at Uni doing a music degree and at my peak, I was much better than I am after a 8 year break.

    So thanks to my previous experience, my knowledge is much higher than my current skill

    Saying that, YouTube is an amazing resource, thanks to content from some amazing brass players so there is still plenty that can be learned fairly conveniently

    I dont have any experience with managing arthritis while playing brass, but would Tuba be more suitable with the less demanding parts and weight mostly held by a stand or chair?
    If I think about stress points on holding a Euph it would be around my thumbs, not an issue for me now, but it could be in the future

    I know nothing about players with arthritis personally, but have noticed older players typically do end up on 3rd cornet and tuba in most bands? Perhaps arthritis is a contributing factor? Forgive me if that is completely wrong.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jharris View Post
    [snip]I know nothing about players with arthritis personally, but have noticed older players typically do end up on 3rd cornet and tuba in most bands? Perhaps arthritis is a contributing factor? Forgive me if that is completely wrong.
    As a player with arthritis, perhaps I can chime in. The arthritis in my thumbs severely affects my piano playing (in my younger days, I played keyboard instruments professionally). I have to use a left-hand brace when I play trombone, to give additional support and relieve pressure on my thumbs. I do not feel that arthritis adversely affects my euphonium playing. The more likely excuses for the quality of my euphonium playing are (a) the forty-year layoff after college and (b) less practice time than I had when I was in college

    As to why an older cornet player may move from first to third - perhaps range? Muscles lose flexibility with age, even with regular exercise.
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1, Kadja, and DE 101XTG9 mouthpieces
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jharris View Post
    ...but have noticed older players typically do end up on 3rd cornet and tuba in most bands? Perhaps arthritis is a contributing factor? Forgive me if that is completely wrong.
    I think it is more chops than arthritis. At least, as it relates to cornet players. Moving to 3rd cornet is going to require more work from your 3rd finger and more difficult fingering patterns in many cases.

    And in my own overqualified-for-AARP chops, I seem to have lost some natural strength over the years. That doesn't mean I can't build up and DO high range (see below), but it does not seem as easy for my chops (strength-wise, not talking about accuracy).


    Here is a demo from 18 months ago where I did a Db (concert) in 6 octaves:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qo1H_Gf43G4

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
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    YouTube: dwerden
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  8. #8
    Glad to hear that arthritis shouldnt stop a person from being able to enjoy brass, my mum and grandma are sufferers, so I will likely have to deal with it sooner or later

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