Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: 2280 vs 24/25i

  1. 2280 vs 24/25i

    Slowly learning my way around the euphonium world. Former pro trombone player learning valves for the ergonomic benefits. I had a Dolce for a couple of years, then a Festivo and now a well used 2280.

    Most people say the Eb tuning and 3rd valve trigger are gimmicks and not usable. I look at them like the E pull on a single valve bass bone. It's there when you need it if you know how.

    Anyway, I like the 4 in front config and front facing bell of the 24i. It has no Eb pull option, and the trigger moves to the main tuning slide.

    Is there a general feeling that one of these is better than the other? I've been thinking of a 5th valve, would one of these work better with a 5th valve than the other? Which do you prefer?

  2. The 2280 is probably a better choice for modern use. The 24i/25i (which I grew up on) are traditional front facing American baritones, smaller bore than the 2280 and not nearly as resonant as the 2280. IMO the high range on the 24i/25i requires more work and its low range is not nearly as open as the 2280. The 2280 has a large shank receiver which provides more options for mouthpiece choices. I DO like the 24i for traditional outdoor summer band concerts, however.

    There are very few great choices for new front action euphoniums these days. The Wessex Festivo or Willson 2975 are kind of "it".
    Last edited by daruby; 04-19-2021 at 08:19 PM.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1065HGS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HGS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  3. #3
    I agree with all of Doug's comments. Many years ago when I had the chance to play in high school honors bands, one kid who played a 2280 always came out on top in auditions, despite the fact that many of us were equally capable on our trusty school-issued American-style baritone horns. The 2280 just has a more characteristic euphonium tone.

    You might notice that the 4th valve tubing on the Conn 24/25I is recurved back on itself, providing two tuning slides rather than just one. Pulling both slides out significantly can lengthen the tubing enough to allow the player to be more or less in tune in the 4th valve register using standard fingerings, at least down to the low C. I believe that this is what Conn intended, based on their brochure description of this model. Certainly this will make the C an octave above very flat, necessitating 1-3 with some 3rd slide pull, but everything's a trade-off.

    Hope this helps a bit.

    Tom

  4. #4
    The first time I heard a 2280, from a guy who was sitting in our community band, it was a head turner because of its warm, resonant sound. I've always liked them since.

  5. #5
    I wonder if someone could answer a Conn 24i/25i question for me.

    When I first began to get interested in the Conn Connstellation, I found the Conn Loyalist articles and later bought mine, which according to serial #, was built some time in 1968. That was the last year in the serial number list of its type, but there were three additional years following. It sounds great and is very comfortable to hold and finger.

    Recently I read that the Connstellation was made until 1971, after some kind of corporate sale by the earlier Conn company. Just a couple months ago someone published an old ad featuring a Connstellation with a large shank MP receiver and some other upgrades.

    Has anyone ever played one of the “modern” Connstellations? Or even seen one? It would seem that they were only sold from 1969-1971, if they were sold at all.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ann reid View Post
    I wonder if someone could answer a Conn 24i/25i question for me.

    When I first began to get interested in the Conn Connstellation, I found the Conn Loyalist articles and later bought mine, which according to serial #, was built some time in 1968. That was the last year in the serial number list of its type, but there were three additional years following. It sounds great and is very comfortable to hold and finger.

    Recently I read that the Connstellation was made until 1971, after some kind of corporate sale by the earlier Conn company. Just a couple months ago someone published an old ad featuring a Connstellation with a large shank MP receiver and some other upgrades.

    Has anyone ever played one of the “modern” Connstellations? Or even seen one? It would seem that they were only sold from 1969-1971, if they were sold at all.

    My understanding is that Conn stopped producing brass instruments in Elkhart, IN by 1970 or '71, at which point production was moved to Abilene, TX. Horns produced after the move are usually marked "USA" rather than "Elkhart, Ind." All of the Connstellations I have seen have carried the Elkhart engraving. However, the later model 4I and 5I euphoniums featured detachable bells that were compatible with the earlier 24/25I. I have seen instances where these later bells have been paired with an earlier 24/25I body. The 4/5I models can be distinguished from the 24/25I by the absence of the tuning trigger and a different 4th valve tubing configuration. I believe these models were made at least into the 1980s.

    The Connstellation horns were made with Remington-shank mouthpiece receivers and came with a compatible Conn 5 mouthpiece. Over the years, many of these horns have been retrofitted with standard small/tenor trombone receivers, and this opens up lots of other mouthpiece options. I've played examples with both receivers and they both work well. I've never seen a large/bass trombone receiver on a Connstellation. I don't think it would be desirable with horns of this type, if it would even fit the leadpipe.

  7. #7
    The Connstellation does not have a Remington shank receiver. The Conn 5's shank is 11.8mm at standard taper, with a tiny backbore. If you don't have the adapter, it's custom mouthpiece time. Remington shank is huge...bigger than large shank.

    Source: Me. I bought a Conn 5 mouthpiece just to measure the stupid thing.
    Hobbyist. Collector. Oval rotary guy. Unpaid shill for Josef Klier mouthpieces.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ann reid View Post
    Recently I read that the Connstellation was made until 1971, after some kind of corporate sale by the earlier Conn company. Just a couple months ago someone published an old ad featuring a Connstellation with a large shank MP receiver and some other upgrades.
    I don't know for sure, but I have a guess for you. First, when the Connstellation first came out Conn made kind-of a big deal about the larger receiver for the Connstellation, and it was to semi-mimic the Besson, I suspect (i.e. in between a small and large shank mouthpiece). Because all American euphoniums at the time had tenor-trombone-size receivers, saying "large" in an ad could easily mean the original Connstellation's size. And it would have cost them engineering money to do that, just to carry on with a model for a couple years.

    You might find this article interesting. Henry Charles Smith talks about the development of the 24i and 25i:

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/content...-Charles-Smith
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •