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Thread: Wilfred Mountain Playing Call of the Seasons by Catelinet

  1. #1

    Wilfred Mountain Playing Call of the Seasons by Catelinet

    When the CG Tuba Quartet played at an ITEC (then T.U.B.A.) event in California in 1978, I was lucky to be able to hear the Hollywood Tabernacle Band of the Salvation Army perform with Wilfred Mountain as soloist. I bought the LP of the group at that time, which also featured Wilfred. This is from that LP. I assume it was recorded somewhere between 1976-1978. The piece was written by Philip Catelinet (also a Salvation Army guy). His photo is below (click to see a larger size), from the Euphoniumists Dinner in London, 1980. My wife and I had lunch with him the next day, and had such a nice time. Catelinet was a great gentleman and a delight to talk with!

    This is a fairly extensive piece, and is one of the early serious works written specifically for euphonium.

    https://youtu.be/_Pq2XPzCwu4


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  2. #2
    I have a little Wilfred Mountain story. When the CG Tuba Quartet played at an ITEC (then T.U.B.A.) event in California in 1978, I was lucky to be able to hear the Hollywood Tabernacle Band of the Salvation Army perform with Wilfred Mountain as soloist. At the conference Wilfred also did a recital, after which there was a Q&A. One college student said that he always hears that British players (which is Mountain's background) sound different from players in the U.S. He asked what there is in Mountain's sound that makes him sound that way. Wilfred said (paraphrasing and shortening it) he didn't know. That is just the sound in his head because he was surrounded by it growing up, but he didn't know what there is in his sound that does that or how one would produce it. To me, that was an understandable answer. But the kid followed up and asked something like "but why?" Wilfred gave him an answer...and the kid followed up once more! Through it all Wilfred was patient and gentlemanly, as you would expect, but the kid never got the specific explanation he sought. I talked to Wilfred afterward and he said he felt bad about not being able to give the kid the answer he wanted, but he just had no information he could have added.

    I think someone like Brian Bowman might have a partly similar answer. He sounds like he does because of what is in his head (which I believe was influenced by his study with Falcone). But Americans tend to think about specifics more, perhaps, and I think Brian could have filled out an answer with some specifics. I'd be in the same boat, but I could not tell you for sure, specifically, technically, why I sound like I do compared to other Americans who might play the same equipment!

    Anyway, Wilfred was a fine player and genuine nice guy. I believe his father was also a Salvation Army band person (a director at some point), if memory serves.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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