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Thread: Returning to brass after 23 years

  1. #1

    Question Returning to brass after 23 years

    Hi everyone,

    When I was school age, I played a EEb tuba for a couple of local brass bands, unfortunately as with many players, it came to an end when I went to university and had to say goodbye to the band. 23 years later, a friend hands me her baritone and we were both as surprised as each other when a rather lovely tone came out and I still remembered enough to play a scale! This sparked off an idea and a week later, there's a shiny new wessex dolce euphonium on it's way to my house.
    Whilst waiting for it to arrive, I guess I'd better arm myself with some music, tuition pieces etc

    Can anyone recommend specific texts/cd/dvds I should buy to help me get back up an running? Any advice?

    Thank you!

    Rhys

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    398
    Welcome back to the fold. I think you will discover that a lot of the members of this group share your experience. I recommend an Arban's method book and join a community band.
    Miraphone 5050 Ambassador
    Mp: Wick SM4 Ultra X
    The San Diego Concert Band
    Big Brass Quartet- tuba ensemble (EETT)

  3. Great advice by tonewheeler!

    If you like hymns, a while back daniel76309 turned me on on to a great book with cd accompaniment at the link below:

    http://www.justforbrass.com/classic-...ano-112008.cfm

    Technique exercies are important of course, but it's nice to have fun and feel like you are a legend in your own mind while practicing too

    Welcome to the forum and enjoy!
    Bob Tampa FL USA
    Euph -- 1984 B&H Round Stamp Sovereign 967 / 1978 Besson NS 767 / Early 90s Sterling MP: 4AL and GW Carbonaria
    Tuba -- 2014 Wisemann 900 CC / 2013 Mack 410 MP: Blokepiece Symphony American Shank and 33.2 #2 Rim

  4. I just noted that this is out of stock at this link. You want the solo book with CD accompaniment. I'm sure if you tool around on the web you can find it in stock somewhere. Just wanted to make sure you didn't get the accompaniment book by mistake!
    Bob Tampa FL USA
    Euph -- 1984 B&H Round Stamp Sovereign 967 / 1978 Besson NS 767 / Early 90s Sterling MP: 4AL and GW Carbonaria
    Tuba -- 2014 Wisemann 900 CC / 2013 Mack 410 MP: Blokepiece Symphony American Shank and 33.2 #2 Rim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,425
    Hi Rhys,

    Yes, welcome back to the fold of brass playing. As a moderator, I see from your IP address that you reside in the south of England. I suspect that you probably read treble clef... but maybe you read both, don't know. If treble, the suggestion of Arbans book stands but maybe get one for trumpet. I still use mine and it's over 50 years old.

    I'm back to playing now 14 years after over 30 year-lay-off.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    El Relicario (Jose Padilla; arr. R. Longfield)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by RickF View Post
    Hi Rhys,

    Yes, welcome back to the fold of brass playing. As a moderator, I see from your IP address that you reside in the south of England. I suspect that you probably read treble clef... but maybe you read both, don't know. If treble, the suggestion of Arbans book stands but maybe get one for trumpet. I still use mine and it's over 50 years old.

    I'm back to playing now 14 years after over 30 year-lay-off.

    Well spotted, I'm in the UK, so yes, I'm more familiar with the treble clef - although I also read choral music so the bass clef isn't totally foreign to me. I'll try to find the Abran trumpet book, it sounds like a sensible option.

    I would dearly love to join a band again but unfortunately, I work away from home most of the time so I can't really commit.

    Thanks for the welcome everyone! I'll let you know how I get on once the instrument arrives. I can't wait!

    Rhys

  7. #7
    Welcome, Rhys! The advice above is spot on. I consider the Arban book an absolute must, and if you can only have one book, it's the one! But make sure you get the Complete Conservatory Method. It has content that is missing is some other editions.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pine Bush, New York
    Posts
    17

    If at all possible, commit to a group

    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Welcome, Rhys! The advice above is spot on. I consider the Arban book an absolute must, and if you can only have one book, it's the one! But make sure you get the Complete Conservatory Method. It has content that is missing is some other editions.
    I also took 20 years off from playing. I stopped playing when I graduated high school in 83. In 2003 I heard the Pine Bush Community Band playing and was inspired. I found an inexpensive euphonium and joined. I am now playing better then I've ever played in high school. And that is thanks to a supportive group a musicians who more then put up with my learning curve and to the bands routine schedule (practice every Monday from March through Christmas, and playing 14 concerts). Being responsible to a group definitely motivated my commitment.

  9. #9
    Along with the Arban I would recommend Bordogni etudes. They are very helpful! One source is Encore Music:

    http://www.encoremupub.com

    I wish you well in your return. Congrats on the new horn!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus1 View Post
    Along with the Arban I would recommend Bordogni etudes. They are very helpful! One source is Encore Music:
    Good tip! Also, Encore carries the Complete Arban book in two versions, treble and bass. The treble version is edited by Allen Vizzutti, and the bass by Brian Bowman and Joe Alessi. If you feel like you need some advice on how to focus the various exercises, the (more expensive) Encore version might be a good investment. They are both well edited and contain very few mistakes (unlike the older bass clef versions).
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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