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New Mini Jazz Tuba

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  • Jonathantuba
    Senior Member
    • Apr 2013
    • 296

    New Mini Jazz Tuba

    I am pleased to announce the Wessex TB162 Mini Jazz tuba is out and we now have the first few in stock. Based on the BBb Mighty Midget tornister tuba, we have fitted a forward facing bell of larger dimensions. This really gives it a noticeably bigger sound - we estimate three times the volume of the Mighty Midget and it sounds a bigger tuba with more breath.

    Obviously not as portable as the Mighty Midget for travel, if you are just looking for a light, small tuba for standing gigs - this may be the answer.


    https://www.wessex-tubas.com/shop/tu...as/tb162-jazz/

    www.Wessex-Tubas.com
    Customer Services & Chicago Showroom visits: Dolce@Wessex-Tubas.com
    Shipping & UK Showroom visits: Coda@Wessex-Tubas.com

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  • Rodgeman
    Senior Member
    • Dec 2014
    • 220

    #2
    Has this gone out of production? I do not see it listed anymore. Thanks.
    Cerveny BBb Kaiser Tuba
    __________________________
    “Don’t only practice your art, but force your way into its secrets, for it and knowledge can raise men to the divine.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven

    Comment

    • rgorscak
      Senior Member
      • Feb 2021
      • 178

      #3
      Does anyone know if I can get a longer tuning slide for the Wessex TB162 Mini Jazz tuba? I got one this past year and when I play it and another individual, it is extremely sharp. I wanted to use it in a Dixieland band, but I think it is going to be too sharp for any of the players I know. A review on the Wessex website mentions they can provide a longer tuning slide, but my emails to them go unanswered. I tried emailing them and posing a question to them on their web page.

      Any help would be appreciated!

      Comment

      • ghmerrill
        Senior Member
        • Dec 2011
        • 2383

        #4
        I had not noticed this instrument previously. I'm really puzzled about what the niche demographic is for it -- wondering in particular what it really offers compared to a large bore compensating euphonium. The bore size is no larger than my euph's is (and in fact may be smaller with regard to my 4th valve circuit). The bell is no bigger. And it sure doesn't weigh any less.

        Sure, I guess, you get the full BBb range ... But I can't believe you'll use any of the deep contra range -- and certainly for most jazz (and most applications of a small tuba) you get that with the large bore comp euph (which is, of course, at least the moral equivalent of a small bore 3-valve F tuba when you hold the 4th valve down). And there are other small (3/4) BBb tubas around -- some in a similar price range -- that are really genuine tubas (Mack Brass TU22L, Tube Exchange TE-690L, Eastman, Schiller, ...). But even with the "full" BBb range, how much of that are you going to be using in a jazz setting, and what's the tone quality there? How much are you going to be delving into the pedal BBb range? I've played a bunch of tuba parts on my euph and never felt range limited.

        Is the attraction here really just for it's "travel capabilities" -- in which case, do you really gain significantly over just using a euph?
        Gary Merrill
        Wessex EEb Bass tuba (DW 3XL or 2XL)
        Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
        Amati Oval Euph (DE 104, Euph J, J6 euph)
        1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba (with std US receiver), Kelly 25
        Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K10/112/14 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
        1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

        Comment

        • rgorscak
          Senior Member
          • Feb 2021
          • 178

          #5
          well, I own it now! When I let someone who sometimes plays the tuba try it, he had trouble playing in tune. I got it because I was trying to get a Dixieland Band together with people in a jazz band I play with or the concert band. The concert band has tuba players, but they don't have sousaphones and playing music standing up is not going to work for them.

          If the horn is unusable, then I will put it into the closet next to the Holton Superbone and Conn Constellation Euphonium I also do not use (amongst other horns)!

          Maybe I will try your idea and have someone play the Euphonium for the tuba part.

          Comment

          • ghmerrill
            Senior Member
            • Dec 2011
            • 2383

            #6
            I'm pretty sure that standing up isn't a requirement in Dixieland music -- unless you're planning on marching in parades. Tuba Skinny seem to sit down all the time -- especially Todd Burdick when he's playing that monster recording bass of his -- either in concerts or in the streets of New Orleans. (Well, okay, Erika Lewis stands up when she sings and sometimes on the bass drum.)
            Gary Merrill
            Wessex EEb Bass tuba (DW 3XL or 2XL)
            Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
            Amati Oval Euph (DE 104, Euph J, J6 euph)
            1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba (with std US receiver), Kelly 25
            Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K10/112/14 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
            1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

            Comment

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