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Ho to improve my technique level?

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  • Joan Albiol
    Junior Member
    • Jan 2024
    • 17

    Ho to improve my technique level?

    I've been looking for a good book to improve my technique when playing (mostly fast fingering, air supply and breathing, and tongue). Up until now I've been using some books such as Arban's or Miquel Badia ones for slurs and scales, but I'm trying to find a more specific book for each of the aspects of my technique. Any suggestion?
  • highpitch
    Senior Member
    • Mar 2006
    • 1034

    #2
    Rouchut etudes is a good book to play from as well.

    Dennis

    Comment

    • aroberts781
      Senior Member
      • Sep 2014
      • 288

      #3
      You could look into the Herbert Clarke "Technical Studies for the Cornet" book for technical exercises. Depending on what clef you read you could get the original book written for cornet in treble clef, or there may be some bass clef transcriptions out there.

      For air/breathing, I have never used it but I know "The Breathing Gym" by Patrick Sheridan and the late Sam Pilafian has many fans.

      I don't know any specific books for tonguing, but I think a good approach would be to use the single and multiple tonguing sections of Arban and play them as written, and also make up your own articulation variations. I think if you search YouTube for "David Werden tonguing" you should find some good examples of how to do that to get you started. Basically you could take any exercise, scale, interval study, etc... and change up your articulation pattern. Do each note as dotted eighth sixteenth, triplet, sextuplet, sixteenth dotted eight, slow double tongue, fast double tongue, slow triple tongue, fast triple tongue, all Tah, all Kah, staccato, accented, legato, etc...

      Hopefully you have a good teacher to give you feedback as you work through this, that will help a ton. I know that isn't something available to all, I didn't start taking lessons until I went to college. Recording yourself and listening will be very helpful as well.
      1976 Besson 3-valve New Standard, DE102/I/I8
      1969 Conn 88H, Schilke 51

      Comment

      • MarChant
        Senior Member
        • Feb 2016
        • 191

        #4
        I have good experience with "Daily Routines for Euphonium" by David Vining. I see it is now somehow credited to Philip Sinder, but I believe it is the same book:

        https://euphonium.com/products/vinin...r-euphonium-bc

        It does not go very deep into each subject, but gives a good foundation for daily use and touches each or most of the subjects you need.
        Martin Monné

        My collection of Brass Instruments

        Comment

        • cpoet89
          Member
          • Mar 2016
          • 56

          #5
          Originally posted by aroberts781 View Post
          You could look into the Herbert Clarke "Technical Studies for the Cornet" book for technical exercises. Depending on what clef you read you could get the original book written for cornet in treble clef, or there may be some bass clef transcriptions out there.

          For air/breathing, I have never used it but I know "The Breathing Gym" by Patrick Sheridan and the late Sam Pilafian has many fans.

          I don't know any specific books for tonguing, but I think a good approach would be to use the single and multiple tonguing sections of Arban and play them as written, and also make up your own articulation variations. I think if you search YouTube for "David Werden tonguing" you should find some good examples of how to do that to get you started. Basically you could take any exercise, scale, interval study, etc... and change up your articulation pattern. Do each note as dotted eighth sixteenth, triplet, sextuplet, sixteenth dotted eight, slow double tongue, fast double tongue, slow triple tongue, fast triple tongue, all Tah, all Kah, staccato, accented, legato, etc...

          Hopefully you have a good teacher to give you feedback as you work through this, that will help a ton. I know that isn't something available to all, I didn't start taking lessons until I went to college. Recording yourself and listening will be very helpful as well.

          Here's another vote for the Clarke's Technical Studies. The exercises in this book have been incredibly helpful to me personally. I probably use the things from this book more than any other.

          I've never been a big fan of the Rochut book. I know it's a pretty "standard" excerpt book for low brass players, but I never really felt that it did much for me. That could absolutely just be me though.

          Comment

          • Joan Albiol
            Junior Member
            • Jan 2024
            • 17

            #6
            Originally posted by highpitch View Post
            Rouchut etudes is a good book to play from as well.

            Dennis
            I already have it, but I don't really know how to "get juice" from it

            Comment

            • Joan Albiol
              Junior Member
              • Jan 2024
              • 17

              #7
              Originally posted by aroberts781 View Post
              You could look into the Herbert Clarke "Technical Studies for the Cornet" book for technical exercises. Depending on what clef you read you could get the original book written for cornet in treble clef, or there may be some bass clef transcriptions out there.

              For air/breathing, I have never used it but I know "The Breathing Gym" by Patrick Sheridan and the late Sam Pilafian has many fans.

              I don't know any specific books for tonguing, but I think a good approach would be to use the single and multiple tonguing sections of Arban and play them as written, and also make up your own articulation variations. I think if you search YouTube for "David Werden tonguing" you should find some good examples of how to do that to get you started. Basically you could take any exercise, scale, interval study, etc... and change up your articulation pattern. Do each note as dotted eighth sixteenth, triplet, sextuplet, sixteenth dotted eight, slow double tongue, fast double tongue, slow triple tongue, fast triple tongue, all Tah, all Kah, staccato, accented, legato, etc...

              Hopefully you have a good teacher to give you feedback as you work through this, that will help a ton. I know that isn't something available to all, I didn't start taking lessons until I went to college. Recording yourself and listening will be very helpful as well.
              Thank you very much for your advice. I'll look for these and practise 'em

              Comment

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