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Thread: FS: Sterling Virtuoso 4-Valve Euphonium In Silver/Gold w Trigger

  1. #1

    Thumbs up FS: Sterling Virtuoso 4-Valve Euphonium In Silver/Gold w Trigger

    This looks like the configuration I used, with a heavy red brass bell. It would have a great sound, in the classic British style in between a Sovereign 968 and 967. A heavy 4th valve cap is shown, and it includes a 3rd-party case. The starting bid is $3999.00 and the buy-it-now price is $5500.

    SOLD FOR $5500 - CONGRATS!

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/175519415198

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    Last edited by davewerden; 12-09-2022 at 09:35 PM.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
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  2. #2
    Dave:
    Didn't realize professional level euphoniums such as the ADAMS and Yamaha were nearing the 10k range these days. Wow. Last time I was in the market for a euphonium, seems like the prices were half that. So I'm wondering if the Buy it Now price of $5500 of the ebay Sterling virtuoso is a bargain price, given the market for new models. From what you can tell by examining the listing, do you think so? JP used to carry a Sterling Virtuoso IV for $7500 or thereabouts. Guess i need to start doing some serious saving.
    Arnold (Arnie) Williams
    Sterling Virtuoso Euphonium with Gold Brass bell (Capitol Pops Band)
    Yamaha YEP-830 Xeno Bass Trombone (Sacramento Concert Band & West Sacramento Community Orchestra)
    Euphonium: K&G 3D
    Bass Trombone: Ferguson M Series Jeff Reynolds

  3. #3
    I played a Sterling for about 20 years, and a Virtuoso model for maybe 5 or so. I liked the Virtuoso a LOT, because it scratched my "British sound" itch. It was also a nice improvement over the Sovereigns I had played for intonation and response (especially in the 4th valve register). There are several new brands & horns that have a big, smooth sound, but in some I feel that something is missing in the tone. The Sterling and the Adams model I chose have that "something". The Adams wins over the Sterling for intonation and has a slight edge that 4th valve register response. But the Sterling has a trigger, which takes care of the intonation nicely (I strongly prefer to not have a trigger for comfort reasons).

    The red brass bell adds a nice bit of zing to the Sterling's sound. I did an A/B test between the Sterling Virtuoso with red brass bell and the Adams E1 with silver bell that I was testing. The Adams won among a pool I had listen to my recordings, but it was not a shut-out game. There were VERY close.

    I know two top players in the British brass band scene who played on a Sterling until they got a "can't refuse" monetary offer from Besson to switch. In one player's case, he had companies giving him horns previously, which Sterling did not do. The Sterling was the only euphonium he ever actually bought.

    The asking price is fair, all things considered, but you could also gamble and put a bid lower than that. If you got it for under $5k I'd think it a bargain.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. I will second Dave's comments regarding Sterling v. Adams. My Sterling Virtuoso with red brass bell is a twin to the one being offered for sale with the exception that mine has a 300 mm bell instead of 12" (305 mm). The biggest difference for me between the two makes is that the Sterling takes more strength to play and I find myself getting tired more easily. My Adams E3 with sterling (small "s") silver bell is incredibly light and responsive yet still gets a fantastic rich sound. Last Sunday I was playing the New England Brass Band having to soar above the ensemble. Tonight I rehearsed a Christmas cantata with a church choir where I was playing a cello obligato part at pianissimo under two elderly vocal soloists. This kind of dynamic range is more difficult for me to execute on the Sterling (big "S").

    Doug
    Adams E3 0.60 Sterling bell - Prototype top sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1065HGS - 300mm red brass bell
    Concord Band
    Winchendon Winds
    Townsend Military Band

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    McIntosh, FL
    Posts
    22
    The Sterling will really sing in a church sanctuary. In a wind band, I thought it seemed to get lost in the texture at lower volume levels. I'm sure it's optimized for brass band playing given its British pedigree. It's a heavy horn, and the leadpipe is very "straight" relative to the valve cluster, which results in the instrument being held at an angle away from the player's body. I used an Ergobrass device with it successfully, but it was still rather cumbersome. I hate to let it go, but for my playing posture and the types of playing that I do, my trusty Besson 767 is a better fit. Here's a link to a church service in which the Sterling was used for prelude and postlude - I think it illustrates these features pretty well: June 28, 2020 - First Presbyterian Church of Gainesville, FL - YouTube

    Tom

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Valley City, North Dakota, USA
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    627
    What pieces did you play for for the prelude and postlude?

    (I guess the postlude was called out (and recognizable)...can you share the arrangements of both and, possibly, where to get them?)
    Euphoniums
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  7. #7
    I did put in a bid on the horn; I'm grateful for tjjc putting in musical examples and explaining the odd playing angle one is forced to use because of the position of the lead pipe. That does give me pause. We'll see how the bidding goes. So far, I think I'm the only bidder.

    I wonder how the sound does compare to ADAMS E3, YEP-842, and other high end horns.
    Arnold (Arnie) Williams
    Sterling Virtuoso Euphonium with Gold Brass bell (Capitol Pops Band)
    Yamaha YEP-830 Xeno Bass Trombone (Sacramento Concert Band & West Sacramento Community Orchestra)
    Euphonium: K&G 3D
    Bass Trombone: Ferguson M Series Jeff Reynolds

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    McIntosh, FL
    Posts
    22
    The Panis Angelicus (C. Franck) arrangement is from this book: Sacred Solos By Various - Sheet Music For Baritone B.C.; Trombone - Buy Print Music HL.4472030 | Sheet Music Plus

    James Curnow's arrangement of I Sing the Mighty Power of God is from this book: Great Hymns By - Softcover Audio Online Sheet Music For Euphonium; Trombone - Buy Print Music HL.44003652 | Sheet Music Plus

    Both books have many other fine arrangements for soloist and piano. I've used them frequently over the years. The Curnow book comes with a practice/accompaniment CD. SMP is a good source, but I've also seen these books in local music stores from time to time.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    McIntosh, FL
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Arnbone Euph View Post
    I did put in a bid on the horn; I'm grateful for tjjc putting in musical examples and explaining the odd playing angle one is forced to use because of the position of the lead pipe. That does give me pause. We'll see how the bidding goes. So far, I think I'm the only bidder.

    I wonder how the sound does compare to ADAMS E3, YEP-842, and other high end horns.
    Some players seem to prefer the straighter leadpipe angle. I guess it depends on your body type and what you're accustomed to. It seems to me that the Besson Prestige has a relatively straight leadpipe as well, but I've never had the chance to do a side-by-side comparison.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Arnbone Euph View Post
    I did put in a bid on the horn; I'm grateful for tjjc putting in musical examples and explaining the odd playing angle one is forced to use because of the position of the lead pipe. That does give me pause. We'll see how the bidding goes. So far, I think I'm the only bidder.

    I wonder how the sound does compare to ADAMS E3, YEP-842, and other high end horns.
    The leadpipe angle is probably more ergonomic, based on my experience. Adams changed their angle in a similar direction, the idea being to not force your elbow back so far. That relieves strain. But I don't know if the current Adams angle is different from the Sterling's angle.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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