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Thread: New Standard?

  1. #1

    New Standard?

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    Hi, my first attempt at posting as a new user. I purchased a Besson euphonium a couple months ago on Craigslist. “Bessie” is a 3valve compensating horn with a ser.#370xxx. I believe this puts her at around 1967. She is in good shape. I just Had new felts and stiffer valve springs installed . I am a trumpet player and have had a blast learning to play the euph. I have two questions:
    1) Is this a New Standard model?
    2) I have all slides all the way in to play in tune. Is this common? What is the recommended way to adjust the pitch so I can have a little wiggle room with the main tuning slide being pulled out a little.
    Fyi, she is med.shank(euro) And came with a Shilke 51 mouthpiece.
    Thanks in advance for your feedback.
    -Brad

  2. #2
    I'm sure one of the vintage Besson experts on this forum will give you some great info, but that looks an awful lot like the New Standard I purchased last year, so I would say yes that is a New Standard. There was some good info shared with me on the thread below that may be helpful to you

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/showthr...n#.YiFnbx5MFEE

    To your question about tuning. I have my second valve slide all the way in, my first and third each out about half an inch, and my main tuning slide out about an inch. But mine is large shank compared to your medium shank and I'm a different person playing on a different mouthpiece so I'm not sure how useful that comparison is.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    885
    If the valve caps are fluted around the edge rather than knurled, it is a New Standard.

    New standards also had tapered valve buttons, but those seem to get lost with some players.

    If all valve hardware is knurled, it is probably a Boosey & Hawkes horn.

    Actually, the only difference is the engraving and the stylish valve hardware.

    Same horn, made in the same factory.

    DG
    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original
    2019 Wessex Tornister

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    151
    The photo definitely appears to support your horn is a Besson New Standard - more specifically a Model 176 within Besson’s 8-10 Series. Refer to pages 16 and 17 within this catalogue.

    https://yorkmaster.org/yorkmaster/ph...mpo/index.html

    Here is a link to a reference to the Besson 8-10 Series line of horns.

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/showthr...1#.YiGA32ROmEc

    My 1971 Besson plays in tune with all slides fully in - testimony to the quality and craftsmanship of that era. Here is a link to tuning.

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/entry.p...e#.YiF5L2ROmEc
    Last edited by Shinn; 03-04-2022 at 07:58 AM.
    David Shinn
    Peninsula Concert Band
    Yorktown, Virginia



    1971 Besson ‘New Standard’ 181 Euphonium (4 valve compensating) ~ Alliance DC3M
    1960 Besson ‘New Standard’ 180 Euphonium (4 valve compensating) ~ Alliance DC3M
    1962 Besson ‘New Standard’ 176 Euphonium (3 valve compensating) ~ Alliance DC3M
    1979 Besson 'New Standard' 168 Baritone (3 valve compensating) ~ Alliance DC5S

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    885
    The enlarged photo didn't load for me, hence my 1,000 words...

    Dennis
    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original
    2019 Wessex Tornister

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Varese,Italy
    Posts
    256
    Mine from 1974 also sounds perfectly in tune with all slides inserted (A = 442). Some typical Besson high notes (partial sixth) are easily tamed with alternate positions or lip adjustments. I replaced the conical buttons (annoying on the fingertips) with the more comfortable ones of the Sovereign and I put the thinner springs, still new and never used, which were part of the 2007 Prestige kit. Soon I intend to add a false tube for the support-support of the right hand in order to make it more easily usable in march services, a job for which, in my case, this horn is mainly intended instead of the heavy and impractical to manage for this purpose, Prestige.
    Have fun playing this vintage horn which despite its age is still, in my opinion, one of the best euphoniums ever built.
    Last edited by franz; 03-04-2022 at 03:13 AM.
    Besson Prestige 2052, 3D+ K&G mouthpiece; JP373 baritone,4B modified K&G mouthpiece; Bach 42GO trombone, T4C K&G mouthpiece; Besson New Standard 3 compensated valves 1974, 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece; Wessex French C tuba 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece.

  7. #7
    Thanks for all the quick responses and links to info!!! It’s especially comforting to hear of the two other Besson owners playing tuning slides in. I just find I need to warm the horn up and she plays with good intonation. As I develop my euph chops I am sure I will get better at lipping the intonation.�� -Brad

  8. #8
    For the sake of additional feedback, I have the removable tilt bell version of the same horn, same vintage. Main slide slammed home to play in tune, even with my toddler size mouthpieces. Not sure why, but that's just the way it is. Probably not a huge concern if it's a bit warm where you're playing.
    Hobbyist. Collector. Oval rotary guy. Unpaid shill for Josef Klier mouthpieces.

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