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Thread: Shires Bravo Euphonium

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Summerfield, Florida Sturgis, SD (previously)
    Posts
    1,698
    Quote Originally Posted by spkissane View Post
    ...Happy to get any other shots of it, OR the Custom SOLO model I still have here in the shop if anyone wants.
    How about a shot of the "other" as in back side of the horn showing details of the handgrip? It looks to me like the handgrip is actually not a dummy tube, but a functioning tube where air goes through it. Is that how non-comps are usually made? Guess I haven't looked that closely, but I don't and haven't owned a non-comp 3+1 horn before.
    Last edited by John Morgan; 02-11-2022 at 02:26 AM.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Kingdom of the Sun (KOS) Concert Band, Ocala, FL (Euphonium)
    KOS Brass Quintet (Trombone, Euphonium)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    245
    Quote Originally Posted by franz View Post
    Positive is also the fact that the piston of the fourth valve is positioned between the main branch and the third pump and not behind, as in compensators, favoring a more ergonomic position, especially for those players with small hands.
    As someone that has fiddled around with a Yamaha 621, I can say that this is actually NOT an ergonomic configuration. The natural way to hold a eupho is already to hold/wrap your hand around the main branch. Having the 4th valve be inbetween the 3rd valve tuning slide and the main branch means you have to bring back your left arm to your body to actually use the 4th valve, causing extra strain on the left wrist and elbow because of the tighter angle, and the more claw-like grip you need to apply to hold both the tubing and the valve casing.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TheJH View Post
    As someone that has fiddled around with a Yamaha 621, I can say that this is actually NOT an ergonomic configuration. The natural way to hold a eupho is already to hold/wrap your hand around the main branch. Having the 4th valve be inbetween the 3rd valve tuning slide and the main branch means you have to bring back your left arm to your body to actually use the 4th valve, causing extra strain on the left wrist and elbow because of the tighter angle, and the more claw-like grip you need to apply to hold both the tubing and the valve casing.
    I feel the same, regarding ergonomics - this design would actually make me feel cramped up a bit. However, players with small hands may feel differently.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #14
    I added photos of the other side of the horn, showing the handgrip, and a shot of the way that's most comfortable for *me* ergonomically to hold it in my left hand - my hand is more "spread" instead of cramped. It feels better that way.
    Last edited by spkissane; 02-11-2022 at 10:32 AM. Reason: spelillgn
    Sean Kissane
    Low Brass Specialist, Paige's Music
    Principal Euphonium, Indianapolis Brass Choir
    Principal Euphonium, Crossroads Brass Band

    Equipment:
    S.E. Shires EUSOLO
    Warburton Gail Robertson mpc

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by spkissane View Post
    ...and a shot of the way that's most comfortable for *me* ergonomically to hold it in my left hand - my hand is more "spread" instead of cramped. It feels better than way.
    Interesting. I tried a similar design several years ago at an ITEC and could not get comfy. It looks like your reach is actually spread more than mine because you still wrap your fingers under the large bow. And the insertion of the 4th valve between the bow and the 3rd slide makes that reach longer. I guess I assumed a person with very small hands might simply wrap their fingers around the 3rd slide. Maybe I just didn't fool with it long enough to find the right combination for me.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Varese,Italy
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    300
    Quote Originally Posted by TheJH View Post
    As someone that has fiddled around with a Yamaha 621, I can say that this is actually NOT an ergonomic configuration. The natural way to hold a eupho is already to hold/wrap your hand around the main branch. Having the 4th valve be inbetween the 3rd valve tuning slide and the main branch means you have to bring back your left arm to your body to actually use the 4th valve, causing extra strain on the left wrist and elbow because of the tighter angle, and the more claw-like grip you need to apply to hold both the tubing and the valve casing.
    I do not agree. I'm playing with the Prestige (4th valve behind the main branch) and with the French C tuba (3 valves operated with the left hand in front): On the Prestige the hand remains rotated at least 60 degrees with respect to the forearm, causing a level stress of the wrist (I use a hand strap on this instrument) and, after a while, a discomfort-pain in the thumb joint that activates the trigger, while on the French tuba the hand remains in line with the forearm totally eliminating the discomfort that I warn with the Prestige. It might just be an individual factor but for me it is.
    Besson Prestige 2052, 3D+ K&G mouthpiece; JP373 baritone,4B modified K&G mouthpiece; Bach 42GO trombone, T4C K&G mouthpiece; Besson New Standard 3 compensated valves 1974, 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece; Wessex French C tuba 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    US East coast
    Posts
    152
    Is anyone using the Bravo as their “main” horn? Still hoping for reviews from people who are playing one on an ongoing basis.

    I’m in a position to try a Bravo and/or the Adams Sonic, but it seems that hands on opinions are hard to come by?

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