Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 45

Thread: Embarking on a new euphonium adventure

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Farmington Hills, MI
    Posts
    368
    How great to be able to try these in person at a brick and mortar store! Very rare in 2022. The general impression is the E2 is most comparable to a Willson 2900 and that the E3 is more of a brass band horn. I guess it depends on the configuration and individual tastes. I personally prefer a lighter horn that resonates. The E2 with yellow brass bell and .8 thickness must be a beast.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Summerfield, Florida
    Posts
    1,604
    Simon,

    So glad you had the chance to play on a bunch of Adams euphoniums. They are, in my humble opinion, the finest euphoniums being made. Have to admit I have not tried any other/newer euphonium brands/models since 2019.

    I am also glad the E2 seems to work so well for you. I played one of those at the last two ITEC conventions I have been to (2016 and 2019) and was impressed. I did this "after" I already had my E3 custom made. I bought the E3 without ever playing any Adams euphonium at all (ordered it in 2015 and got it in spring 2016). My purchase was based almost entirely on the descriptions and experience of a select few euphonium players (but mostly Dave Werden - who interested me in the Adams brand, and Matt Van Emmerik - who interested me in the E3 and bell engraving).

    Something I found with the E3, and I think Dave Werden may have said something similar, was that you sort of had to learn some of the aspects of the Adams, let it work for you to get the most out of it. And same with the sterling silver bell. I found that true.

    I loved the horn right out of the box, but I also "grew" into this horn. When my band leader first heard it, he was impressed with the horn. He had been used to hearing me play a Miraphone M5050, which was a great horn. So, he wasn't blown away right off the bat, but he thought it was very nice, and somewhat different from the Miraphone. Over time, he would occasionally tell me how much he liked the horn, and eventually that he really, really liked the sound of the E3. I think in part that is because I grew into this horn and learned how to get the most out of it.

    So I think it is quite possible that experienced euphonium players can try Adams models (or perhaps other brands as well), and based on their own styles and habits, can get an early opinion of a horn that if tried again or over time, might possibly change.

    I think from reading your post that you felt you could try out the horns in fairly short order and make an opinion/decision and that may surely be entirely true. But I would suggest that if you are not in a real hurry to get a new horn, and since you seem to live relatively close to a place where you can try various Adams models, to give all of the Adams models one or more sessions to confirm your choice. And perhaps put the AGR out 2-3 full turns on each horn. I would love having a music dealer close to me so that I could go and try everything out!! Well, maybe not, actually, because I would end up with a dozen horns!!

    Good luck in your pursuits, Simon!

    John
    Last edited by John Morgan; 03-02-2022 at 06:07 PM.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band, Ocala, FL (Euphonium)

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    Simon,

    So glad you had the chance to play on a bunch of Adams euphoniums. They are, in my humble opinion, the finest euphoniums being made. Have to admit I have not tried any other/newer euphonium brands/models since 2019.

    I am also glad the E2 seems to work so well for you. I played one of those at the last two ITEC conventions I have been to (2016 and 2019) and was impressed. I did this "after" I already had my E3 custom made. I bought the E3 without ever playing any Adams euphonium at all (ordered it in 2015 and got it in spring 2016). My purchase was based almost entirely on the descriptions and experience of a select few euphonium players (but mostly Dave Werden - who interested me in the Adams brand, and Matt Van Emmerik - who interested me in the E3 and bell engraving).

    Something I found with the E3, and I think Dave Werden may have said something similar, was that you sort of had to learn some of the aspects of the Adams, let it work for you to get the most out of it. And same with the sterling silver bell. I found that true.

    I loved the horn right out of the box, but I also "grew" into this horn. When my band leader first heard it, he was impressed with the horn. He had been used to hearing me play a Miraphone M5050, which was a great horn. So, he wasn't blown away right off the bat, but he thought it was very nice, and somewhat different from the Miraphone. Over time, he would occasionally tell me how much he liked the horn, and eventually that he really, really liked the sound of the E3. I think in part that is because I grew into this horn and learned how to get the most out of it.

    So I think it is quite possible that experienced euphonium players can try Adams models (or perhaps other brands as well), and based on their own styles and habits, can get an early opinion of a horn that if tried again or over time, might possibly change.

    I think from reading your post that you felt you could try out the horns in fairly short order and make an opinion/decision and that may surely be entirely true. But I would suggest that if you are not in a real hurry to get a new horn, and since you seem to live relatively close to a place where you can try various Adams models, to give all of the Adams models one or more sessions to confirm your choice. And perhaps put the AGR out 2-3 full turns on each horn. I would love having a music dealer close to me so that I could go and try everything out!! Well, maybe not, actually, because I would end up with a dozen horns!!

    Good luck in your pursuits, Simon!

    John
    Thanks for your comment John. I am happy that I have made the right choice - I made notes of what I experienced while I was there, and as anticipated, the audition took one hour and a half. The instruments were a lacquer E1 with sterling bell, a silver plated E2, and a silver plated E3.

    The E3 was too light. At brass band fortissimo (or giving it bell-tink, or blowing the thing straight!) the sound went thin, which is a criticism I had of the Besson 967GS - too thin and energy lost through the whole instrument vibrating. I thought the 1 and 3 were fairly close in terms of playing characteristic, but the sterling bell I thought gave the E1 a evenness of sound that was quite appealing, but on further audition might have translated into a sound that is little too lifeless.

    I referred back to the Sovereign after each Adams, with precisely the same music and exercises. Make no mistake, all of the Adams' outperformed the Sovereign in one or more areas, it's just the E2 was better in EVERY regard. Ergonomically it felt better but that may be because I'm used to lugging a heavy instrument around. The thing that surprised me the most was the fact I could play quieter on the E2 than the B&H.

    I have requested E2, satin lacquer, trigger, 3rd slide water key deletion, perspex belly guard, and blue abalone buttons. I may revert to having a 3rd slide water key. The order is being confirmed tomorrow. I do wonder whether I should have bright lacquer slides and valve caps but it might look like a tart's handbag!

    Finally, the Marcus Bonna case is a wonderful bit of kit.
    Adams E2 0.80 Yellow Brass, Satin Lacquer, Blue Abalone Buttons
    AR Resonance M Top / L Backbore Gold Plated Phosphor Bronze

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Summerfield, Florida
    Posts
    1,604
    That sounds like a very smashing horn that you are going to get!! I bet you will absolutely love it!! The satin lacquer is beautiful, I really love it on mine. I get virtually nothing out of my third slide so a water key deletion might not be a bad thing. You can always wrestle the third slide out once in a long while if needed. Enjoy your horn!!
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band, Ocala, FL (Euphonium)

  5. #15
    Order is confirmed, and deposit paid! E2, Satin lacquer, trigger, blue abalone; and didnít bother deleting the 3rd slide water key. Itís safe to say Iíve not been so excited about a euphonium since I owned the very first B&H Sovereign as made for Lyndon Baglin.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Summerfield, Florida
    Posts
    1,604
    Yippee!! Pretty exciting indeed!! Good for you, Simon!
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band, Ocala, FL (Euphonium)

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Summerville (SC)
    Posts
    317
    Congrats Simon, while I have found so far only one useful clip of E2 on youtube, I find it to be a very special and impressive-sounding euphonium:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7t07Sd7tbk

    What mouthpiece did you use to test it?

    Once you receive your darling E2, I hope you will record and post a good clip whilst putting your new baby through its musical paces!

    Regards, Guido
    Wessex EP104 Festivo + DC4, SM4U, 51D

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Varese,Italy
    Posts
    254
    Some time ago I went to an Adams dealer musical instrument shop a few hundred km from where I live and I tried the models they had ( E1 silver bell 0,6 thickness, E1 red brass bell 0,6, E3 yellow brass bell 0,6) but, at the moment, they did not have any E2 available. Although I enjoyed the sound and intonation of the Adams, I still preferred my Besson Prestige 2052. I would like to try an E3 0,7 and an E2 ( my favorite in the video published by Algirdas Matonis)

    (https://youtu.be/bgIbkQKXtck )

    (https://youtu.be/b7dk46jlUK4)

    but my opinion is that I cannot justify the expense for a new euphonium which, compared to my current one, brings me a completely negligible and aleatory improvement, especially considering that I am a medium-level amateur player.
    Last edited by franz; 03-11-2022 at 04:06 AM.
    Besson Prestige 2052, 3D+ K&G mouthpiece; JP373 baritone,4B modified K&G mouthpiece; Bach 42GO trombone, T4C K&G mouthpiece; Besson New Standard 3 compensated valves 1974, 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece; Wessex French C tuba 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece.

  9. #19
    Itís always worth weighing up the tangible benefits. The Besson Prestige is a decent banjo. Iíd be curious as to what made you stuck with the Besson, even though your preferred the sound and intonation of the Adams? To me, the only criteria is sound - the fact the Adams has demonstrably better intonation is a added bonus.

    This isnít without risk, no purchase is but the E2 outperformed the round stamp (up until then the best euphonium range Iíve played) in every regard, so even not playing the E2 in a band setting is a dampener.

    (Slightly facetious) I have watched a lot of videos of the new generation of euphonium wunderkinds and whilst in awe of their technique; wonder if any of them play louder than MF.

    The E1 and 3 didnít respond anywhere near as well at the upper end of dynamics as the 2 did, and as thatís where I spend most of my time (MF or louder) thatís what sold it. That and the fact I could play quieter on the E2 than either of the others.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Varese,Italy
    Posts
    254
    Quote Originally Posted by Magikarp View Post
    It’s always worth weighing up the tangible benefits. The Besson Prestige is a decent banjo. I’d be curious as to what made you stuck with the Besson, even though your preferred the sound and intonation of the Adams?
    In the comparison I made between the Adams and my Prestige, personally and also listening to them played by my friend I had a slight preference for the Besson. The intonation on the sixth partial was better on the Adams, but not perfect and, although the high intonation of the sixth partial on the Bessons (and on almost all brass) is known, it is easily managed by the trigger. The limiting factor, in my case, is the economic one: 7K € for a new euph is too much for me, considering the unprofessional use I make of it. Let's put my wife's opinion to the contrary and the picture is complete. Anyway I keep an eye on the shop and when an E2 becomes available (it was a few months ago, but it was sold before I could go and try it) I will give it a change. Listening to the Matonis video, where the opening tune is played on an E2 and finally on the Prestige, the E2 has a darker, fuller and more penetrating sound, the Besson lighter and lighter but equally beautiful to my ears.
    Besson Prestige 2052, 3D+ K&G mouthpiece; JP373 baritone,4B modified K&G mouthpiece; Bach 42GO trombone, T4C K&G mouthpiece; Besson New Standard 3 compensated valves 1974, 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece; Wessex French C tuba 3D+ K&G modified mouthpiece.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •