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Thread: Leather grips & best lubrication on Adams E1

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  1. #1

    Leather grips & best lubrication on Adams E1

    Hey all,

    I just had a few questions regarding an Adams E1 euphonium. I am looking at ordering in some leather grips through LSC for an Adams E1 euphonium - primarily grips for the left hand around the bell pipe in front of the 4th valve, and possibly over the 3rd valve slide and tubing. I checked through the LSC website and they don't seem to stock any grips specifically for an Adams euphonium. Would anyone have any alternative brands to try that would happen to fit on an E1? I was thinking of Hirsbrunner assuming it would be a close fit.

    Additionally, which valve oil and lubricant for the tuning slide (with a trigger) would you recommend for an Adams? I have always been a big fan of Blue Juice, but I would prefer to use whichever oil gives the best results on Adams valves, no matter what brand it is. For the tuning slide with a trigger, I have seen people recommend either very light slide grease (like Ultra Pure Light) or trombone slide cream. Which would be the most preferred?

    Finally, which spring combination would give me the closest results to the lightness of Yamaha valves? Sticking with the stock Adams springs or moving possibly to Mead Light Springs.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    I'll have to let someone else answer about the leather grips because I don't use them. I can tell you that the left-hand strap I use had to be adjusted when I went from an E1 to an E3, so the braces must be slightly different in that area.

    The Adams valves are close-fitting and require a light oil. I am currently using Blue Juice, which is my preferred standard oil. If you like synthetics, Hetmann #1 is good. I have also tried the Yamaha light and it seems about as good.

    On my Sterling's trigger I did indeed use trombone slide cream, but I don't know if the Adams trigger operation is similar enough for my experience to count!

    For most people I think the Mead Light springs are a nice upgrade from the standard springs. There is less distance from the bottom of the piston's travel to the bottom cap than a Besson has, so the standard Mead Springs on an Adams are for people looking to build bulging muscles on their fingers
    Last edited by davewerden; 12-26-2021 at 04:19 PM.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,071
    I think very highly of Resilience Oils' "F-1 Kick Gel" for any "movable" slides. Don't be put off by its "gel" designation. It's more like a heavy valve oil, and in fact I now use it as valve oil on my 1924 Buescher tuba. But I also use it for the "kick slide" (3rd valve tuning slide) on that horn.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba (with std US receiver), Kellyberg
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  4. I suggest using Blue Juice on the valves. Works best for me on my E3.
    As for the trigger, I use Hetmans 6.5 for the trigger. I lightly apply it and then use a few drops of valve oil to get it moving the way I want….
    Last edited by DutchEupho; 12-28-2021 at 01:16 AM.

  5. Ditto
    Sterling Virtuoso 1065HGS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HGS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Summerfield, Florida
    Posts
    1,610
    Ditto2
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band, Ocala, FL (Euphonium)

  7. #7
    I find Blue Juice's smell to be objectionable, so I use a synthetic. I've been using a 50/50 mixture of Yamaha Light Synthetic and Yamaha Regular Synthetic on my 4-year-old E2. Seems to work well - I get a little more mileage between oilings than if I used the straight Light Synthetic, though the valves are not sluggish at all.
    U.S. Army, Retired (built mid-1950s)
    Adams E2 Euph (built 2017)
    Boosey & Co. Imperial Euph (built 1941)
    Edwards B454 Bass Trombone (built 2012)
    Boosey & Hawkes Imperial Eb tuba (built 1958)
    Kanstul 33-T lBBb tuba (built 2010)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,071
    Ditto on Yamaha synthetic oils. They are my general go-to valve oils, and I use the Light one on my Wessex Eb horn and Mack euphonium. Unlike the Resilience oils, the Yamaha oils are TOTALLY odorless.

    Ditto also on the Blue Juice smell. I really find it intolerable. But it's funny how sensitive or insensitive people are to smells like this. Another oil I use (not in a musical instrument context) is the legendary Ballistol, which has a rather distinctive smell that I don't mind at all. But my wife can't stand it and I have to thoroughly dispose of any rags/patches/wipes outside the house. The source of the odor in this case is generally regarded to be anethole (anis) which is one of it's known components, though it doesn't smell like licorice to me.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba (with std US receiver), Kellyberg
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    NYC metro area
    Posts
    458
    I have the Mack Brass euphonium. I've tried Hetman, Blue Juice (yes, the odor), Yamaha, and Resilience. I've found the best results and least build-up of gunk with Resilience. My body chemistry may be a contributing factor.
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1 (DE 101XTG9 mouthpiece in the drawer)
    Bach 36B trombone; Bach 6.5AL mouthpiece (pBone on loan to granddaughter)
    Steinway 1902 Model A, restored by AC Pianocraft in 1988; Kawai MP8, Yamaha KX-76
    See my avatar: Jazz (the black cockapoo) and Delilah (the cavapoo) keep me company while practicing

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by dsurkin View Post
    ...least build-up of gunk with Resilience. My body chemistry may be a contributing factor.
    That is what makes choosing an oil so complicated! What works for me in an E3 might not work for John's E3, for example, because of our different chemistry.

    Tangent: I just saw a post from the Resilience folks, which made me think they are doing business. As a new company (new to me, at least) I was not sure how they would fare in this market with the various shutdowns, etc. It's nice to have all the oil choices!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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