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Thread: Can you help me identify this instrument? Eb Alto Horn?

  1. Quote Originally Posted by highpitch View Post
    A nice mate to my York Bb tenor horn. Very similar construction techniques, same era.

    F/Eb sounds like the most probable deal with that little curl. The horn may have been ordered in F, then changed to Eb down the road.

    The main procurement division of the US military for many years:

    https://quartermaster.army.mil/history/

    Dennis
    Dennis, I'd love to see a pic of your York Bb tenor horn! The info on the quartermaster corp was an interesting read. Thanks for that link.
    I can easily see how the horn could be made to be an F alto horn. That totally makes sense!

    Dave, the length of that "loop" seems to be exactly the length of the 1st valve (approximately 4.25 inches) so it looks like it would bring it up to F. Would the fingerings then correspond to a Horn in F?

  2. #12
    I have a York euphonium with this feature. The extra slide serves to lengthen the main tuning slide and convert it from high pitch to low pitch. York had a patent on this, and the slide is likely to be stamped with a 1909 patent pending label. The 1st and 3rd slides should have a mark showing the nominal position for low pitch. The York euphoniums with this feature used two separate slides for the 2nd valve. Unfortunately, "low pitch" was not A-440, but something a bit lower.

    Edit: As I look more closely, it isn't the same scheme as is used on my York. However, I think the purpose may be similar. In your instance, I would expect that there were originally two slides, one for high and the other for low.

    Another edit: I get it it now, the loop is not adjustable... my above comments aren't relevant (:X
    Last edited by carbogast; 12-20-2021 at 02:01 PM. Reason: I should have read the thread more closely!

  3. Quote Originally Posted by carbogast View Post
    I have a York euphonium with this feature. The extra slide serves to lengthen the main tuning slide and convert it from high pitch to low pitch. York had a patent on this, and the slide is likely to be stamped with a 1909 patent pending label. The 1st and 3rd slides should have a mark showing the nominal position for low pitch. The York euphoniums with this feature used two separate slides for the 2nd valve. Unfortunately, "low pitch" was not A-440, but something a bit lower.

    Edit: As I look more closely, it isn't the same scheme as is used on my York. However, I think the purpose may be similar. In your instance, I would expect that there were originally two slides, one for high and the other for low.

    Another edit: I get it it now, the loop is not adjustable... my above comments aren't relevant (:X
    Thanks for looking at my post. You're right, it isn't adjustable. It could be removed but I think I'd prefer it be in Eb and not F. Any reason I might want it in F? I'd be curious to see a pic of your York or to have the model number so I could look up a pic.

  4. #14
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    Here are some photos of my ~1910 York euphonium. The High/Low pitch adapter can be seen at the lower left of the 1st photo. The adapter can be seen in the low pitch position in the 2nd. The slide set is shown in the 3rd. Top to bottom: Pitch adapter, 3rd valve (you can see the HP/LP mark), two 2nd valve slides, one for each pitch, and finally the 1st valve slide.

  5. Yes, I see! Thanks so much for taking the time to post these. It makes total sense.

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