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Thread: The "one book" question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    Vinton,VA
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    The "one book" question

    All of us have collected multiples of books over our long/short careers of playing -- techniques, daily routines, exercises for specific purposes, flows, songs, etc. If you could recommend only one book for the average amateur player to use all the time, which would it be?

  2. #2
    Probably Arbans.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    Sacramento, CA area
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    224
    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    Probably Arbans.
    I just had to laugh when I read this response. Arbans has more content than modern method books, easily 5X. There is much more to chose from when practicing. Jean-Baptiste Arbans included a wide range of techniques and exercises for specific purposes. You don't have to work your way up to book three (or whichever it happens to be in the series you are working through) before you get to the advanced material. It's all there, beginner through pro.

    Much of the material was based on tunes that were popular during his day. As a modern musician, I just wish I recognized more of them. As a beginner or average amateur player, it is easier to tell whether you are "doing it right" if you already have some idea what is should sound like.

    - Sara
    Last edited by Sara Hood; 06-19-2021 at 04:41 PM.
    Baritone - 3 Valve, Compensating, JinBao JBBR1240

  4. #4
    I have said for years that my desert island book is the Arban Complete Conservatory Method. No book has everything, but this one has a great variety. And you can extend it with a little imagination. I did a video a while back about simple ways to expand the book, which might help especially for euphonium players with our extra range:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CPdoZDezdE
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Vinton,VA
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    I don't know why I expected anything other than Arbans. I first saw it in the 7th grade, used through high school, and was the first book I bought when starting playing again at 70'ish.

  6. #6
    I will also vote for Arban. As a member of the target demographic, average amateur, it is the book I use the most. I do use Rochut a lot to work on musicality, and I prefer the melodies in there more than the songs in Arban. But, as Sara and Dave said so well, there is so much in Arban from very easy to very challenging, lots of different things to work on, lots of ways to vary it and change it up, etc etc etc.

  7. Arbans is great for technical stuff, but I would choose Rochut 1 because melodies teach you more than exercises.

  8. #8
    Not to be overlooked: the Complete Conservatory Method of Arban has 150 songs in the middle and several full solos at the end, most of which have a verse and a theme. Certainly the Rochut is more advanced musically, and includes some technical challenges, especially when you get to volume 3.
    Last edited by davewerden; 06-20-2021 at 08:31 AM.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  9. #9
    To hyperbolica's point, I agree that Rochut 1 would be a good choice as well. When it comes to books, I use it and Arban. As I said above, I prefer the tunes in Rochut more than the songs/solos in Arban, so I do prefer Rochut to Arban in that regard.

    An interesting question might be this - if an average amateur devoted their practice time all to Arban or all to Rochut (probably not advisable ha), which average player would be more prepared to make music in a solo or group setting. My uneducated hunch is it would be the Arban player. Just seems to me like that person would have more tools with which to craft the art.

  10. #10
    I would say the Arban student would be better prepared, if the choice were ONLY THE Arban OR ONLY THE Rochut. Many of the Arban's songs are familiar, which can aid one in developing musicianship, especially less-experienced players. To me, Rochut would be introduced after a foundation is learned from Arban, ALONG WITH other music material (cello suites, etc.). But that goes against the whole "one book" focus of this thread.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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