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Thread: Your Favourite non 3+1 Euph, and why?

  1. Your Favourite non 3+1 Euph, and why?

    Please let me have your recommendations.

    Cheers,
    S

  2. #2
    Shall we assume you still want 4 valves? If not, I'd say the 3-valve compensating Bessons.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  3. Assume nothing

  4. #4
    OK, my answer stands, but here are the conditions:

    - to play in a concert band (knowing that perhaps 1% of the music you might encounter would require a 4th valve, and there is usually a workaround in those cases)
    - OR to play in other limited situations, like a church ensemble or for solo work that does not need to go to the low range below E
    - someone who does not care to do "full-blooded" practice (i.e. full-range, playing Bach cello suites and such as a development tool)

    A 3-v comp Besson has the classic Besson sound and is in tune on the tricky 13 and 123 combos. It also has the sharp 6th partial, so some work will be needed there from the player. I know someone who simply put a ring on the 1st slide (and vented the 1st valve) so the concert Eb and some other 12 combos could be tuned that way.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  5. #5
    For a 4-valve solution in a modern, compensating solution, Wessex has a front-valve inline 4 choice here:

    https://wessex-tubas.com/collections...uphonium-ep104

    The horn has been spoken of positively on the forum here. Perhaps we can get some of the folks to chime in on this thread.

    For someone who is primarily a trombone player (other than bass trombone) a classic American 4-valve might work very well. Intonation is good and they are very well suited for the standard concert band literature. Here are two examples:

    King:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/King-2268-4...n/133346242289

    Conn Connstellation:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/C-G-Conn-Co...r/293550149338
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  6. Thank you, Dave. Would you have a model number/range of model numbers I should look out for?
    I must admit I've tried to understand the Besson heritage and I've come away confused.

    The floor is still open for other suggestions. And yeah, by not going 3+1 I do realise something is necessarily getting sacrificed.

  7. I second Dave. I have owned or played (extensively) the following:

    1. 3 front valve/bell front - Conn (14I/20I), Reynolds Contempora, Olds Ambassador, King 2265, Yamaha 211
    2. 3 top action valve/bell up - Pan American 56I, Yamaha 201
    3. 4 front valve/bell front/bell up - Conn Connstellation (24I/25I) and King 2266/2268
    4. 5 valve double bell - Holton and Conn
    5. 4 top action/bell up - Yamaha 321 and King 2280
    6. 3 top action valve compensating - Besson New Standard - (bell up and bell front for marching)
    7. 3+1 non compensating - Besson 765/1065, etc.
    8. 3+1 compensating (Besson, Sterling, Adams, Willson, Miraphone, York, Wessex, JP Sterling, etc.)
    9. 4 front valve/bell up compensating - Wessex Festivo and Willson 2275

    Of all of these, I favor the following after we throw out the 3+1 and DB configurations.

    1. 4 top valve non compensating - I like the Yamaha 321 best. King 2280 is good too, but I do not think it gets as sweet of a sound (when I play it)
    2. 3 top valve compensating Besson New Standard - I greatly prefer the upright bell. See Dave's comments above.
    3. 4 front valve compensating - Wessex or Willson - I find these instruments awkward for me, top heavy and with uncomfortable lead pipe angles.
    4. 4 front valve non-compensating - Traditional American style - Conn Connstellation (25I) or King (2268). For sound I prefer upright bell.
    5. Any 3 valve non-compensating euphonium - Nice sound but intonation and range (lack thereof) issues abound. Tend to be student horns.

    Doug
    Last edited by daruby; 08-11-2020 at 12:40 PM.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1065HGS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HGS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  8. #8
    As someone who has come to the euphonium with an unfortunate set of physical limitations, I would consider ALL of the advice offered here, and then, most important, seek out as many of those instruments to try before you buy.

    I own 3 of the horns mentioned here, and like elements of each of them, but the one I like most and play all the time, is a choice I would never have made when I started playing. I doubt I’d ever “need” anything different in the future, but of course if I saw one in brushed silver, I’m sure I’d have a hard time saying “no”.

  9. Thanks for the ranking, Doug. That's useful, and a useful way of thinking about it.

    Ann, which is your favourite?

  10. #10
    Depends upon playing needs and budget. Some great horns listed in this thread!

    Non-Comp - Yamaha YEP321

    Comp - Budget conscious: Mack or Wessex Dolce

    Non-budget conscious: Yamaha NEO
    John 3:16

    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

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