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Thread: New Horn New Life

  1. #1

    New Horn New Life

    Fam,

    Well, I sold the Neo. It was a fine horn, one of the finest I've ever played, but just wasn't working for me. I used the money to purchase miketeachesclass's original Adams E3 with SS Bell and have been playing on it the last week or so. Missing the sound of my original yellow brass E3 (which I sold to help fund my brass band) this one is an excellent example of the E3. The SS is going to take some time to get used to. Sometimes I can feel that sparkle, but it is very strange - the sound appears to float or project from midway between the end of the bell and the leadpipe, which is a bit disorienting. It's almost like playing a front facing valve horn where the bell points "the other way". I don't remember that happening with any other horn. I can't wait to take this horn to a bigger room, my office limits how much the horn is able to open up.

    Has any one else experienced this with the SS bell?
    Adams E3 0.6 with SS Bell
    K&G 3.5D

  2. #2
    I've never played any such beast. My weapons of choice tend to run the low end of three digits. I do, however, have a suggestion. Try some earmuffs or an ear plug and cover/protect the ear closest to the horn with the other ear open. This will give you a better idea of what your horn is going to sound like in a bigger room and hopefully give you some added confidence in your sound.
    Hobbyist. Collector. Oval rotary guy. Unpaid shill for Josef Klier mouthpieces.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Leadwood, MO
    Posts
    580
    I didn't see a response to this but would be curious about it. I've owned silver instruments but never had a solid sterling bell. Curious of the adjustment for it. I know Dave has one and seems to like it?
    John 3:16

    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  4. #4
    "With great power comes great responsibility" sort-of applies here! There sterling bell does require a bit more attention, or maybe just a different type of mental focus as you play. I began to wonder if was the right choice for me, which is partly why I tested that .70 E3 in yellow brass. It seemed like someone who was not very experienced might have an easier time getting a nice sound from the yellow .70 model. But with lots of testing, it did in fact seem that the sterling bell had more potential, and was really not hard to play.

    One example was getting a bit darker, more mysterious sound from it when the music called for it. Couldn't quite get as much change from the yellow (although it still did well).

    I think a player with a light approach to the instrument, i.e. a less energetic method of driving the thing, might like yellow brass better. BUT BUT BUT... at exhibits and on Instagram I have seen plenty of examples of light players who chose the sterling bell. Given the added price, I have to assume they really liked it!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Leadwood, MO
    Posts
    580
    Thanks Dave. I also wondered about whether it is simply the Sterling Bell or if the instrument thickness affects it as well. I notice Adams has horns from .5 or so up to .7 or .8 in thickness. I don't see other brands sharing that info. I have no idea what the thickness on a Willson is for example. Thanks for sharing.

    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    "With great power comes great responsibility" sort-of applies here! There sterling bell does require a bit more attention, or maybe just a different type of mental focus as you play. I began to wonder if was the right choice for me, which is partly why I tested that .70 E3 in yellow brass. It seemed like someone who was not very experienced might have an easier time getting a nice sound from the yellow .70 model. But with lots of testing, it did in fact seem that the sterling bell had more potential, and was really not hard to play.

    One example was getting a bit darker, more mysterious sound from it when the music called for it. Couldn't quite get as much change from the yellow (although it still did well).

    I think a player with a light approach to the instrument, i.e. a less energetic method of driving the thing, might like yellow brass better. BUT BUT BUT... at exhibits and on Instagram I have seen plenty of examples of light players who chose the sterling bell. Given the added price, I have to assume they really liked it!
    John 3:16

    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  6. #6
    Part of my issue was the 2 month layoff after covid shelter in place started and all groups were cancelled. As I've worked on it more I've been able to engage really nice sounds. The yellow brass was easier to play though. And I found posts when I first got my yellow brass E3 that said how much harder IT was to play than the previous Geneva I had.

    All things being equal, I am probably just getting used to a new horn after a long-ish layoff.
    Adams E3 0.6 with SS Bell
    K&G 3.5D

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