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Thread: A notation question?

  1. BTW, my brother, John, and I performed this suite on clarinet and euphonium in a recital in 2018. He did mvmts 1, 3 , 5 and I did 2, 4, 6. His version was in the original key and mine was down a step. The accompanist had to arrange her music to skip between versions on every movement! Gloria is in her '80's and a wonderful pianist. She did this without missing a beat. I also performed this on English Baritone in 2010 (or so) at the NABBA in Raleigh, NC accompanied by Stephen Bulla.

    Doug
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
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  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by daruby View Post
    I was a computer science major and never took a Music Theory class, or any academic music class, for that matter!!! I did manage to rehearse and/or perform 20-30 hours/week my last couple of years in University, though.
    20-30 hours - wow! One might suspect you used your computer skills to hack into the schools academic requirements db to arrange this
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
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  3. Dvae,

    It was the last year ('73) of Computer Science through the College of Letters and Science. The following year, the CS merged with EE and became EECS through the Engineering School. I never would have been able to immerse myself in music performance if that were the case. But since I was in the "Liberal Arts" school, I was able to use ensembles in the Music department (also Letters and Science) to count towards my graduation as long as I did the minimum prerequisites in Comp Sci. So I played in the Cal Band (huge time commitment), University Jazz Band, Wind Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, some free-lance stuff, etc., etc. Kept me sane in a pretty insane time (late 60's early 70's).

    Doug
    Last edited by daruby; 05-01-2020 at 03:38 PM.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by daruby View Post
    You are, of course, so correct. Now you know my secret. I was a computer science major and never took a Music Theory class, or any academic music class, for that matter!!! I did manage to rehearse and/or perform 20-30 hours/week my last couple of years in University, though.
    Aha! You have spilled the beans! But, I, too, must confess! Full disclosure, I have a BS in Mathematics. And an MS (courtesy of the U.S. Army) in Computer Science with emphasis in Cryptography!! And I, too, never had a formal Music Theory class in college, although I have done a lot of independent study of theory on my own. (I own the traditional harmony/theory books and workbooks and have used them extensively over the years). And I still am and always was a prolific player, as I suspect you were/are, too.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
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  5. John,

    Both of my parents were music majors at the Univ. of Michigan, with my dad graduating in '42 and my mother in '43. Dad ended up as a band director after the war and my mom played and taught violin and viola. I absolutely enjoyed playing cello and euphonium in my schools years/ While I had marvelous private instructors (not my parents) as a beginner through high school, I was determined NEVER to become a music teacher, so I avoided all forms of academic music (Music Theory, harmony, composition, etc.). I was determined never to make music my business.

    To this day, I have so much respect for good music teachers, that I have avoided all suggestions of teaching on my own with just 2 exceptions. I did tutor two young euphonium players in the last 3 years. One auditioned at a number of schools and is finishing his second year at CMU on euphonium/trombone. The other graduates this year from HS and is planning a "science/technical" direction (like me) but wanted to improve his level of play so he could participate effectively at the college level. In both cases, they came to me on recommendation from their private teacher (a trumpet player) with the goal of working on sound, repertoire, and musicianship, areas I can help.

    Doug
    Last edited by daruby; 05-01-2020 at 03:58 PM.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    And I, too, never had a formal Music Theory class in college, although I have done a lot of independent study of theory on my own. (I own the traditional harmony/theory books and workbooks and have used them extensively over the years).
    Care to share the names and authors of a few of those "traditional harmony/theory books and workbooks"? For those of us interested in doing some "independent study of theory on our own."

    - Sara
    Baritone - 3 Valve, Compensating, JinBao JBBR1240

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sara Hood View Post
    Care to share the names and authors of a few of those "traditional harmony/theory books and workbooks"? For those of us interested in doing some "independent study of theory on our own."

    - Sara
    Sara,

    I would be happy to. The older books I own and have used are Elie Siegmeister's "Harmony and Melody" along with the workbook in two volumes (I am showing my age here).

    More recently I bought and am using "Tonal Harmony" and workbook by Stefan Kostka, Dorothy Payne and Byron Almén. I believe these books are pretty widely used currently and are up to the eighth or ninth editions.

    I also use a book called "Eyes and Ears" by Benjamin Crowell. It is a book on sight-singing, in other words, it helps you be able to look at music and sing how it should go, both rhythm and pitch. That skill is real helpful. You learn how to look at music you may be interested in, and you can internalize how it should sound before even playing it.

    The theory books usually cover 4 semesters of Music Theory classes, typically taken in the Freshman and Sophomore years of a 4 year music degree.

    As an aside, I was considering, up until a few years ago, going to an online program from a college in North Dakota to get a BA in music. Having a BS already (and an MS), it would be just music courses. I looked into it pretty seriously, had all my transcripts sent, and found I could pretty much do it right from home, as I already had all of the ensemble requirements (I played in band all through college), and my days in The U.S. Army Band would translate into some fulfillment of other requirements. I have been involved with music my whole life, I hang out with a lot of former and current band directors and the like, and just sort of wanted to "get my official credentials" in music. But, alas, life happened, and I never did it. I would not have used a music degree for any future job or teaching, I have been well retired for more than 15 years. It would just be for my own personal satisfaction.

    Hope the book references are useful, Sara.

    John
    Last edited by John Morgan; 05-01-2020 at 10:49 PM.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  8. #18
    Join Date
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    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    Sara,

    I would be happy to. The older books I own and have used are Elie Siegmeister's "Harmony and Melody" along with the workbook in two volumes (I am showing my age here).

    More recently I bought and am using "Tonal Harmony" and workbook by Stefan Kostka, Dorothy Payne and Byron Almén. I believe these books are pretty widely used currently and are up to the eighth or ninth editions.

    I also use a book called "Eyes and Ears" by Benjamin Crowell. It is a book on sight-singing, in other words, it helps you be able to look at music and sing how it should go, both rhythm and pitch. That skill is real helpful. You learn how to look at music you may be interested in, and you can internalize how it should sound before even playing it.[snip]
    I have another suggestion for a book on harmony. The first harmony book I worked from (in elementary school - I really loved music theory) was Walter Piston's "Harmony." In college, my theory professor preferred to teach from his own notes; he didn't care for any of the available texts, and those lecture notes I preserved contain many gems of insight. My last composition teacher was a student of a student of Harold Schoenberg, and he pointed me to Schoenberg's books "Theory of Harmony" and "Structural Functions of Harmony." These are NOT books on twelve-tone theory, but instead cover harmony from classical to post-impressionistic periods. His analysis works equally well across genres - classical, jazz, pop - and I highly recommend these books. Amazon shows "Theory of Harmony" as available.
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1, Kadja, and DE 101XTG9 mouthpieces
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  9. #19
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    Mar 2017
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    Sacramento, CA area
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    Um, is that supposed to be Arnold Shoenburg, rather than Harold Schoenberg?
    - Sara
    Baritone - 3 Valve, Compensating, JinBao JBBR1240

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Sara Hood View Post
    Um, is that supposed to be Arnold Shoenburg, rather than Harold Schoenberg?
    - Sara
    Dean will have to say for sure, but you're pro'ly right. I've met Harold Schonberg (official spelling), and I know a little of his career, which, I believe, did not include teaching and/or writing on music theory.
    David Bjornstad

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