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Thread: A notation question?

  1. #1

    A notation question?

    My last lesson was March 3, and I practice at least an hour every day, pandemic or not.
    Iíve added a couple scales and a one octave chromatic scale, slowly, and working with a metronome to improve the scales I do in two octaves.
    Iíve added 3 or 4 pieces from Arbanís Trombone book, and Rochut 7.

    So I decided to buy a copy of Vaughan Williamsí ďSix Studies........Ē because I love it, not too hard etc.

    This version is in 3 voices, treble clef, bass clef in Bb, and bass clef in C. It is a Stainer and Bell product. No accompaniment score, just the three euphonium parts.

    My question is, which bass clef part would work for me with the piano score, the Bb or the C? I assume this would have to do with British notation for low brass right? Or is it something else?

    Bottom line should I practice Bb or C?

    Any suggestions will be appreciated!

  2. #2
    You'll want to use the C bass clef part. Bb bass clef is for folks in certain countries in continental Europe like Belgium that have a transposing bass clef tradition. The Brit tradition is based on transposing treble clef.
    Adrian L. Quince
    Composer, Conductor, Euphoniumist
    www.adrianquince.com

    Kanstul 976 - SM4U

  3. #3
    Ann,

    Play the bass clef part where the first study has one sharp, and the very first note is an E natural. I looked up the euphonium music you bought and then I looked up the piano score.

    That is a nice piece of music.

    John
    Last edited by John Morgan; 04-26-2020 at 12:58 AM.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  4. #4
    Thanks to you both!

  5. #5
    I’m back for more info on this topic. After working on a couple of these, I’m ready to go the whole nine yards to get them up to my standard of performance ready.

    Sometimes as a long time musician and simultaneously a beginner, I forget important things, and this is a case in point. Obviously, there are editions of these, so is there anything close to an urtext version that works for euphonium? And is there a euphonium version in print that is a preferred learning version?

    I’ve listened to versions online in which the slurs, phrasing, even tied note lengths etc are very different from the one I have. I’ve done some vocal solos by VW and played most of the wind ensemble work, but I need more direction about how much liberty to take with “Six Studies.....”.

    Thank you for any help you can give me!

  6. #6
    Well, first things first. I have lived a sheltered life. I had absolutely no idea what "urtext" meant and thought you mistyped a word. I looked it up and learned something today. Thanks for that!!

    Now as for how to play the Six Studies... I can't say for sure how it should be played, but if you are playing this alone or with a piano accompaniment, then clearly you have the liberty to play the work as you please and feel. And if you are really familiar with Vaughn Williams and his works, you probably know a lot about his music and style already.

    Go here to get a score for cello and piano. https://imslp.org/wiki/6_Studies_in_...iams%2C_Ralph)

    VW wrote this piece for Cello and Piano. It has been transcribed for other instruments by him and others. The score above may show how it was intended, at least for the cello. If I were looking for an authentic version for euphonium, I would simply play the cello part, although in looking it over, some of it may be beyond the range of most euphonium players. Probably why other versions for other instruments were transcribed. But you could clearly use it to check slurs, phrasing, ties, etc. that you mentioned above.

    There is also a bit of information in Wikipedia here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_St...lish_Folk_Song

    Hope that helps a bit.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  7. My favorite edition of "Six Studies in English Folk-Song" is the adaptation done by Paul Droste, formerly band director of The Ohio State University Marching Band (aka Best Damn Band in the Land). He is also former director of the Brass Band of Columbus and served two terms as chairman of NABBA. He is also a euphonium player and recordings of his performance of the work are available.

    In my version, published by Galaxy Music Corporation in 1986, the first movement is in concert F and starts on the mid-staff D. This is down one full step from the original Vaughan-Williams work for cello. That one full step helps out a lot in several of the movements. It includes piano accompaniment in the transposed keys as well. Droste's recording is of this version. I think I downloaded it from Apple some time ago.

    See if you can find this online. If not, PM me and I might be able to help.

    Doug
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by daruby View Post
    ...In my version, published by Galaxy Music Corporation in 1986, the first movement is in concert F and starts on the mid-staff D. This is down one full step from the original Vaughan-Williams work for cello...Doug
    I think it is actually D minor instead of concert F. The original is up a step and in E minor.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  9. #9
    Doug mentioned Paul Droste's recording of the "Six Studies in English Folk Song". Go here to listen: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...tGoqp0zXLj64iM

    Doug is right, this is nice.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  10. Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    I think it is actually D minor instead of concert F. The original is up a step and in E minor.
    You are, of course, so correct. Now you know my secret. I was a computer science major and never took a Music Theory class, or any academic music class, for that matter!!! I did manage to rehearse and/or perform 20-30 hours/week my last couple of years in University, though.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

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