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Thread: Wessex Sinfonico

  1. #1

    Wessex Sinfonico

    Hey everyone,

    I have heard different details about this instrument. My questions are if instrument an actual professional model, or is it a semi-professional model. Is it a pro model like a Yamaha Neo or a semi-pro model like a JP 374? Also anyone who has played this horn, how does it play compared to a top of the line pro model horn?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    California
    Posts
    19
    Itís an incredible horn for under $3,000. I won a spot into a Marine band on the Wessex Dolce, and when I played the sinfůnico, I was blown away by how much of an improvement over the dolce (which I already liked). My problem with the dolce was that it was thin metal and didnít have the sonic mass of the pro horns. From what I could tell in the exhibition room, it was a lot more solid feeling and projecting.

    Iíd honestly compare it to an adams e3 in how it feels to play, it also sounded alarmingly good. Itís not a Willson or an Adams, but itís a third of the cost. Honestly, I liked it more than the Yamaha Neo or 842, but thatís just my first impressions of the sinfonico and Iím sure people will disagree with me.

    Whatís your end goal? Iím not sure how itíd stack up at a premier band audition, but short of that I donít imagine it would hold you back. Wessex also has a great return policy if you donít like the horn.

    Alex S.

  3. #3
    It's a hard instrument to categorize. I've only played the prototype so far, so I can't comment on the production model. My best guess is that it is a clear step up from the Dolce level. As Alex said above, it is not a pro model. So far those two comparisons seem clear.

    What is harder to say is where the Sinfonico fits among the mid-priced instruments. So far those horns are similar to their cheaper siblings for construction methods, but the Sinfonico is made differently, and that affects its response and sound. I believe this may be a superior choice to similarly-priced horns, but we'll see how the reviews/opinions evolve.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #4
    What I find interesting is that Sinfonico appears to sport the same 15.0mm - 17.0mm bore size as the new Shire Q40 and Q41, as well as the Hirsbrunner 479...

    I found no other euphoniums this far with this large 17mm bore on the 4th valve, and a difference of 2mm between valves 1-2-3 and valve 4.

    Alexis at Shires suggested that the adoption of the large 17.00mm bore on the Shires Q-series euphoniums is expected to yield greater support to the player in the lower range.

    Not having heard any good examples of Sinfonico nor Hirsbrunner clips yet, I am never the less wondering if there may be a common thread amongst the tonal characteristics of all these horns.

    TO the best of my knowledge, BNarcisi might be one of the few who until recently owned Sinfonico, and still owns Hirsbrunner 479, and Shires Q40.... Perhaps he can comment on my conjecture, or happily tell me that, well... I'm out to lunch *Grins!*

    Saluti, G.
    Euph - Wessex EP104 Festivo - SM4U
    Flugel - Kanstul 1525
    Trpt - Adams A4 LB
    Bb Cornet -Carolbrass CCR-7772R-GSS
    Eb Cornet - Carolbrass CCR-7775-GSS

  5. #5
    I'll ask Adams, but I'm guessing the 16mm bore size is for the first part of the 4th valve loop. There are usually 3 measurements: main bore, early compensating loop, 4th valve main loop. Adams' site quotes 16mm, which is about .630. Not sure which side that is. I can also get my caliper out and check tomorrow.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  6. #6
    My own measurements would say that my E3 (probably the E1/2 as well) has a 16mm 4th bore on both sides. That is interesting to me because I think my Virtuoso used 15mm for the main bore, 16 for compensating loop, and 17 for the 4th valve. But despite those measurements all my Adams have been freer in the low register.

    As always, measurements are interesting but don't mean a lot - certainly they are not the "bottom line." When I switched from Besson New Standard to Besson Sovereign 967, the only difference between the 2 was the leadpipe and bell. All other tubes were the same. But the 967 had a much stuffier low range than the different New Standards I had played previously. One would assume the leadpipe, which helped it get the tone I was looking for, had a negative effect on the low range response.

    Both brand observations for MY experience. Perhaps others felt different results on comparable horns.

    RE: Shires. I didn't mention it in my review, but I always play from the pedal range going into the stuffy 4th valve range above pedal Bb. The move from Bb to B is tricky under the best of circumstances (from an open, free note, to a note that uses every slide and twist in the tubes, plus you move from the top note of the first partial to the very bottom available note of the 2nd partial). The Shires, if I remember correctly, seemed roughly as good as my Adams, which is impressive for me. Some others may have a more solid low range than I and for them this may not be an issue to note. In any case, I did not notice an improvement on that register compared to my Adams, even though a larger bore should contribute to that. (This might be better on a Shires that was broken in already, or perhaps a newer production sample - I'll check that out next time I am near one.)
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  7. #7
    Thank you Dave for all the additional information!

    Doubtless, the performance of an instrument is the result of the interactions of a myriad of variables, the bore of the 4th valve being but one of very many.

    I am looking forward to following your future experiences with new euphos, including Wessex Sinfonico, Shires Q40/Q41, and any other euphophilic "upcoming attractions".

    Saluti, Guido
    Last edited by guidocorona; 02-16-2020 at 10:30 AM.
    Euph - Wessex EP104 Festivo - SM4U
    Flugel - Kanstul 1525
    Trpt - Adams A4 LB
    Bb Cornet -Carolbrass CCR-7772R-GSS
    Eb Cornet - Carolbrass CCR-7775-GSS

  8. #8
    My son and I were just in DC. He is a euphonium performance and biology major at Carnegie Mellon and looking to upgrade from his Dolce.

    He adored the Adams E1 with the sterling silver bell. But of all the horns we tried there, the Wessex Sinfonico was a close second.

    Honestly, he canít seem to justify paying more than three times more for the Adams he loves. The Wessex is beautiful, a step up from the Dolce and was comparable intonation-wise to the Adams with our contact tuner.

    I donít know that I wouldnít call it a ďprofessional horn.ď

    My son is unlikely to want a military job and he is uncertain about higher education. His interest is in wellness and health science for musicians. I know Iíd rather buy him the Adams but I feel as if he is going to choose the Sinfonico and see if our local low brass wizard can put a tuning trigger on it.

  9. #9
    Hi Dave.....was speaking with the Wessex Agent yesterday about a possible launch date for the Sinfonico in Australia/NZ which was originally planned for April 2020, however the factory is presently closed due to the Virus & he isn`t sure about it`s re-opening, hence the launch date has also been put back to a date unknown.

    Many Wessex players are looking forward to the new model and hoping that the valve issues will be a thing of the past.

    Love your posts & FB vids, keep up the good work.

    Regards

    Frank

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Euphism View Post
    Hey everyone,

    I have heard different details about this instrument. My questions are if instrument an actual professional model, or is it a semi-professional model. Is it a pro model like a Yamaha Neo or a semi-pro model like a JP 374? Also anyone who has played this horn, how does it play compared to a top of the line pro model horn?
    What is a professional horn? It is surely one that is suitable for use by professionals which the new Sinfonico most certainly is - it has been tried out by top professionals. In fact the less expensive Dolce is used by professionals, in the Cincinnati Symphony no less for example.

    The Sinfonico is also all individually handmade from sheet brass, which puts it nearer to an Adams than a production made Yamaha Neo or JP374. In other words this is a euphonium to comparable with those 3-5 times the cost. It is made in a completely different workshop to the previous Dolce - in Wessex new high-grade workshop by craftsmen which just build for Wessex to our demanding standards.

    As said above manufacture has been interrupted by the Coronavirus. The Sinfonico already made are I believe all sold, so we have got to wait for production to resume to get more manufactured. Once we have a timeline, I will make an announcement.
    www.Wessex-Tubas.com
    Customer Services & Chicago Showroom visits: Opus@Wessex-Tubas.com
    Shipping & UK Showroom visits: Coda@Wessex-Tubas.com
    Technical Advice and Parts: Dacapo@Wessex-Tubas.com

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