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Thread: ----Overwhelmed-----

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Laval, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    3

    ----Overwhelmed-----

    Hi Guys,
    With all the materials books and what we see on line its get really easy to become overwhelmed( slurs/high register/low register/triple/double etc!!!! LOL). I am at the point that when i sit down to practice fundamentals i get stressed and iam stuck in the same rut, i don't feel like i am advancing. I don't know where to turn.
    What do you guys do to overcome this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    728
    There is a big difference between 'technical' artistry and playing pleasure.

    Maybe pick out a couple tunes you LIKE to play, and run thru them every time you practice or warm up.

    Your ability to improve is much easier when you look forward to playing.

    Dennis
    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1917 Conn C/D/Eb mellophone original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original

  3. #3
    Dennis jumped right in with an important concept. You need to have SOME materials in your daily routine that satisfy your musical side. I'll often play the theme portion of some of my favorite solos. If that gets too boring, take one of those you like and play it by ear in different keys - all the while keeping your musical side working to make it beautiful.

    I OFTEN have to go to fundamentals because of an irregular practice schedule. Half the time I make up my own exercises, based on scales, broken scales and patterns, and arpeggios.

    You need to keep your brain engaged, obviously. Here is what I did this morning as I was warming up:

    1. I played chromatically from Bb (2nd line of bass clef, or 1st ledger line below the treble staff, depending on what you prefer) to the F a fifth above Bb. I'll keep talking in bass clef.
    2. Next I play chromatically A to F# (start a half step lower, go a half step higher).
    3. Then start on Ab and go up to G (start a whole step lower, go to a whole step higher.
    4. Etc., as far as I like. That gets me thinking as I try to keep track of the new interval on each end, and it gradually gets me to the upper and lower notes that we commonly use.


    I do similar mental/chop exercises each day.

    You might find value in this book that I put together. The exercises are challenging and use patterns that are different in some ways from the ones we are "used to." (This link lets you order a printed version or you can download a PDF version, which might be easier from your country):

    https://www.sheetmusicplus.com/searc...s&aff_id=15680

    I use my Arban Complete Conservatory Method just about every day. There are many wonderful exercises, and, give that our expected range is wider than Arban wrote, I expand or transpose some. I vary between trying to play machine-like (very even and straight) and trying to play even technical exercises as though there are a piece of music.

    I find it very important to use the slow melodies in the middle of the Complete edition to sharpen my musical skills.

    Here is a video that might help you get 2 or 3 times as much value from your Arban practice:

    https://youtu.be/7CPdoZDezdE
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. I've used this book for every instrument, from trumpet to french horn and now euphonium. It is written for french horn, but really that doesn't matter. It is the intervals, articulations and range practice with pleasing melodies that keeps it on my stand.

    https://www.alfred.com/preparatory-m.../p/00-EL00082/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Laval, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    3
    Thanks guys!!! keep the good info coming!
    I really appreciate it!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    382
    Steven Meade came out with a couple of play-along books, which came out with a CD to play with that are helpful. Each track allowed you to switch back and forth to each part. I've found it challenging and it also broke up the monotony of the Arban and other technique books.

    Also, playing in a small ensemble, like a tuba quartet, broke things up too. With small groups there is "no where to hide" and is a challenge to dial in some of the techniques you develop when practicing alone. When playing with my tuba quartet, I've discovered some my own areas I need to work on by myself. It has helped in advancing and making me a better player- keeping me out of the 'ruts'. Just a thought.
    Miraphone 5050 Ambassador
    Mp: Wick SM4 Ultra X
    The San Diego Concert Band
    Big Brass Quartet- tuba ensemble (EETT)

  7. #7
    tonewheeler made me think of something else you could do. If you have any smart-phone or computer software that lets you do multi-track (there are several free programs), play some duets with yourself. Do NOT set a click track, though. It can be very revealing where your tempo may change when you have no such intention - you might notice it on the 2nd part as you try to record in sync. And it can be a good way to work on intonation, too, because your sharp/flat tendencies could be different on a given harmony in part 1 and part 2.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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