Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Compensating euphonium as an F-tuba?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Intermountain West in USA
    Posts
    18

    Compensating euphonium as an F-tuba?

    I read somewhere that when the fourth valve is held down on a compensating euphonium it can be treated as if it were a three valve F-tuba. Is that correct?

    If one wanted to play it as an F-tuba would a person use a different mouthpiece than a euphonium mouthpiece?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    The answer to your first question is yes, mostly. The length of the horn and the fingerings are like a 3-valve F tuba (that is non-compensating), but it is a lot stuffier. By having to play via the 4th valve you are adding some cylindrical tubing an F tuba would not have. And when you use the first 3 valves, you are going through some extra turns and 2 sets of slides for each valve.

    2nd question: yes for me; not everyone may agree on that one. I typically used a Wick 3AL when I had lots of low stuff. Some might use a modified tuba mouthpiece.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  3. When playing tuba parts, I use a Bach 1 1/2G. Helps get the lows to pop.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,017
    I find the 1 1/2G to be a bit big and instead use my regular DE Euph mouthpiece (but it's already pretty big). I find the Wick 3AL to be a bit small for this purpose. It depends partly on your euphonium and partly on you. Some experimentation (roughly in the range of a 3AL-1AL or 1.5G) should be expected -- and you should expect to change your mind as you gain more experience using the horn in that way. A good "exercise" is to go through the Tuba 1 parts in the Tuba Christmas book. I've used a euph several times on that part.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Intermountain West in USA
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by ghmerrill View Post
    I find the 1 1/2G to be a bit big and instead use my regular DE Euph mouthpiece (but it's already pretty big). I find the Wick 3AL to be a bit small for this purpose. It depends partly on your euphonium and partly on you. Some experimentation (roughly in the range of a 3AL-1AL or 1.5G) should be expected -- and you should expect to change your mind as you gain more experience using the horn in that way. A good "exercise" is to go through the Tuba 1 parts in the Tuba Christmas book. I've used a euph several times on that part.
    Interesting idea to use the Tuba Christmas book. Thanks. And thanks to the other posters too.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •