Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Common bass trombone mouthpieces

  1. Common bass trombone mouthpieces

    Hi all,

    I double on a Getzen 1052 bass trombone and use a Bach 1G megatone mouthpiece. It's pretty much the only MP I've used on bass trombone, so I was wondering which MPs are more commonly used for that instrument. Any input you could offer based on your experience would be appreciated!

    Thanks!
    -JK
    James Kircoff
    Genesee Wind Symphony - principal euphonium (Adams E3 Custom .60mm yellow brass bell w/ Parker 4G Houser)
    Capital City Brass Band (2019 NABBA 2nd section champions) - 1st baritone (Besson BE956 w/ Denis Wick 6BY) and 10 piece ensemble (Getzen 1052FD bass trombone w/ Bach 1G)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,013
    Surely the Bach 1.5 (and its clones and numerous imitators) is the most commonly found bass trombone mouthpiece. A 1G would fall on the "large" side (along with the Doug Yeo piece which has a definite following). But even among the 1.5-sized pieces there is quite a variance in size. I've tried more pieces than I can now remember, running from a Wick 2NAL (relatively small, but a nice bright Wickish sound) to the Yeo (way too big for me -- and for most people, I think).

    The Doug Elliott pieces (of various sizes, rim contours and materials, and bowl dimensions) are extremely popular, and one of those is my choice as well. I'd characterize it as a kind of "large 1.5" or "small 1.25" size, with an open back bore.

    My own experience is that mouthpiece choice makes much more difference in sound/timbre on a trombone than on a tuba, and one's choice will heavily depend on the sound you want out of the horn you have.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  3. #3
    I play a Marcinckiewicz GR model which is now renamed a 1 1/2 G. It is a bit deeper with a bigger throat than the Bach version with the same number, but it works very well on my Yamaha 322R bass bone. I also have a Marc 3 which has the same rim as the GR, but is a little shallower with a smaller throat, for when I need to be able to play some extended sections in the upper register for a chart in our big band.

    There was a thread on the GR models over on the Trombone Chat forum and a significant number there liked the Marc version and a couple of the other signature bass bone mps from Marcinckiewicz.

  4. #4
    I play the Yamaha Douglas Yeo model bass trombone and have found the Yeo signature mouthpiece that comes with it to work pretty well for me. My high range isn't great, but I can manage a high Bb when I have to. I like the sound I get with that mouthpiece, particularly notes between low F (right below the staff) to about F above the staff. I have tried others, but still prefer the Yeo model.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  5. #5
    My bass trombone teacher, who plays in two area symphonies and small ensembles recommended the Ferguson M series DF Gold (available from the Horn Guys). That's what I use and I love it.

  6. The 1G is a classic BIG mouthpiece, as is the Schilke 60. Those were the big "toilet bowl" mouthpieces used by many players before there were all these other options.

    The 1 1/2G and Schilke 59 are more of the "standard bass trombone" size. However it all depends on what works best for you. Some would consider the 1 1/2G and Schilke 59 "outdated" due to their smaller throats.

    The Ferguson mouthpieces are all nice and well-designed. They are made by James New, who was the mouthpiece maker at Kanstul before they unfortunately were forced to close. From what I understand, the Ferguson bass trombone mouthpieces are based off of Larry Minick designs, so they should be excellent. The L in particular was based of the Minnick L, of which they had two to copy, and Legend Phil Teele picked the best one. I may have to pick up a model L.

    I play a Faxx 1 1/2 G for most orchestral playing, which is a replica of a Bach Mount Vernon Era 1 1/2G. For more "commercial" playing I go for a Laskey 85MD, which is more of a Bach 1 1/4G, with a bigger throat an back bore. It's really a great piece.
    Last edited by tbonesullivan; 11-28-2019 at 11:33 AM.
    Sterling / Perantucci 1065HGS Euphonium, Yamaha YBB-631S BBb Tuba, and a bunch of trombones.

  7. #7
    The adage of finding what "works for you" still stands as valid..and probably always will. As an example, the Bach 1G was used for many years by Randy Hawes, Detroit Symphony, and now on the Northwestern faculty (later in his career). IMO, he is one of the finest, most modest bass trombone experts in the world. Bottom-line: There is Nothing really wrong with a Bach 1G.

    The rub on the Bach models was that they lacked "mass" (Doug Yeo's observation) especially near the rim...which effected proper response. I think Doug Yeo's observation on this speciic weakness is correct. Based on my experience, I am more focused on the bore size with bass trombone mouthpieces. Anything below .3 inches is suspect. I personally use Hammonds, a 20BL and a 21BXL.

    There is no right choice, really...depends on the venue. Studio work, for example, often brings about needs for smaller pieces to produce a very specific sound...and hence rim diameter and bore selection will vary considerably.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by GeneralPierre View Post
    The adage of finding what "works for you" still stands as valid..and probably always will. As an example, the Bach 1G was used for many years by Randy Hawes, Detroit Symphony, and now on the Northwestern faculty (later in his career). IMO, he is one of the finest, most modest bass trombone experts in the world. Bottom-line: There is Nothing really wrong with a Bach 1G.

    The rub on the Bach models was that they lacked "mass" (Doug Yeo's observation) especially near the rim...which effected proper response. I think Doug Yeo's observation on this speciic weakness is correct. Based on my experience, I am more focused on the bore size with bass trombone mouthpieces. Anything below .3 inches is suspect. I personally use Hammonds, a 20BL and a 21BXL.
    The Schilke 60 is also really thin walled. This is basically the result of Bach and others using the same mouthpiece blank for all of their large bore mouthpieces. So the wider the cup, the less mass it has. The Doug Yeo mouthpiece has a CHUNKY blank, so it has some nice thick walls.

    These days however there is a lot more out there, with many custom makers offering a variety of different blanks, some of which are almost "skeletal", while others are quite massive.

    What works for YOU is key. Also, the horn you are working with will have some what of an effect on that too. I'm a big proponent of the mouthpiece NEEDING to match the horn, particularly in the backbore and throat areas.
    Sterling / Perantucci 1065HGS Euphonium, Yamaha YBB-631S BBb Tuba, and a bunch of trombones.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •