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Thread: ADAMS E1 I hardly knew ye

  1. #1

    ADAMS E1 I hardly knew ye

    On slow days I find myself cruising through the forum to older and older posts. One thing I've noticed is that more than one pro-level player among us began their love affair with ADAMS horns with the E1 Sterling Silver .6, but later (sometimes after a few years) moved on to the E3 or in some cases, the E2 in another, because the E1 in the end was just too quiet perhaps and tended to get lost in certain playing environments. It's interesting how we are drawn to instruments and spend much of our prep time in a room just listening to ourselves and can marvel at certain sound qualities that appeal to us only to realize later that in a concert band environment or brass band or just in the kind of venues we find ourselves playing in that that sound we loved in isolation can fall short.

    This is just an observation I've made, but for those of you who did move on from the E1 to other ADAMS models, what in particular were you after?

    And by the way, loved reading John Morgan's missive on how he embraced the Miraphone 5050 Ambassador and then much later moved to the ADAMS E3. Great reading in these archives for sure.

  2. #2
    Glad you found the reviews enjoyable. Many reviews by many folks here makes for a great forum indeed.

    About the E3, I actually didn't move to the E3 from an E1. I sort of made an equivalent E1 to E3 switch when I moved from my Yamaha 842 to a Miraphone M5050. Now I know the Yamaha and Adams aren't alike, but the analogy might be sort of accurate. The Yamaha plays on the bright side and the Miraphone on the dark, huge side. I suppose the E1 to E3 could be some of that, a smaller (but great) sound, perhaps a little brighter on the E1, to a dark, rounder and bigger sound on the E3. I went directly to the E3 from the Miraphone because I suspected the E3 would play bigger, fuller, darker, etc. (actually kind of like the Miraphone), and I wasn't disappointed. I also spoke with some folks who had played both the E1 and E3 to get their thoughts on both horns. It was a pretty easy decision for me. I switched from the Miraphone to get a horn that took a little less air, I really did like the Miraphone A LOT. I have played on the E1 and E2 since obtaining my E3. Both are great horns, but I am happy with my decision to have opted for the E3 right out of the gate, rather than migrating from an E1.

    So, in summary, I picked an E3 for the big sound, dark and round tone, and ability to project over any ensemble (within reason). I also picked the brand Adams for the way they build their horns and for being able to customize the horn to my liking. I have not had one day since getting my Adams where I am not completely happy with the E3.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  3. #3
    As for me, if the E3 had been available when I first got an Adams I would have chosen it. For me, as for John, I want maximum projection ability when I need it.

    In my Besson days, my 967 satisfied that need, but I was a little frustrated when trying to play softly or in a "small environment" (i.e. recital hall with piano). I find the E3 handles both situations to my satisfaction.

    The tone color of a euphonium has always been a yes/no factor. The original Willson 2900 was in the "no" category for me, for example, although I would not have ruled out the 2960 if it had been around then. I always liked the British sound flavor, which is why I stuck with Besson and then moved to Sterling. But the Adams had the same quality I look for in tone, but had superior response and intonation.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    In my Besson days, my 967 satisfied that need, but I was a little frustrated when trying to play softly or in a "small environment" (i.e. recital hall with piano). I find the E3 handles both situations to my satisfaction.

    The tone color of a euphonium has always been a yes/no factor. The original Willson 2900 was in the "no" category for me, for example, although I would not have ruled out the 2960 if it had been around then. I always liked the British sound flavor, which is why I stuck with Besson and then moved to Sterling. But the Adams had the same quality I look for in tone, but had superior response and intonation.
    I played a 967 built in the early 2000s for years. It suffered from poor intonation above the 5th partial, and it developed several cases of red rot. It was not the best experience with an instrument so I sold it and I have never really considered Besson instruments ever since, although their quality has supposedly improved since they moved production to Germany.

    I too am partial to the British sound, which is primarily attributable to Steve Mead being an influence during my younger days. I played a Sterling for several years before switching to the Adams E3, which gives me a good British sound with incredible response and intonation across the board (I had to rely on a trigger with the Sterling when playing above a F4). The only issue I have with Adams is their finish on both lacqured and plated instruments -- it's not as well done as other manufacturers.
    James Kircoff
    Genesee Wind Symphony - principal euphonium (Adams E3 Custom .60mm yellow brass bell w/ Parker 4G Houser)
    Capital City Brass Band (2019 NABBA 2nd section champions) - 1st baritone (Besson BE956 w/ Denis Wick 6BY) and 10 piece ensemble (Getzen 1052FD bass trombone w/ Bach 1G)

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