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Thread: High Bridge Brass

  1. High Bridge Brass

    Hello all,

    I’d like to introduce the High Bridge Brass, an all conical brass quintet. The quintet’s members are:

    Chris Martin of the New York Philharmonic and Mark Ridenour of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on Cornets.

    Nathan Miller of Asbury University on Tenor Horn

    Hiram Diaz of Washington D.C. on Euphonium

    Chris Tiedeman of Washington D.C. on Tuba


    We have a newly released album available for sale at:

    Highbridgebrass.com

    The album features Ewald quintets 1 and 3 and the Bohme sextet in their intended instrumentation. Please visit the website for more details about the album and about our upcoming performances!

    Best,

    Hiram
    Last edited by davewerden; 11-08-2019 at 12:37 PM. Reason: Added hyperlink to website

  2. #2
    Congratulations on the new CD! It's nice to see efforts to use conical brass, particularly when that is what the composer(s) expected.

    For those who are not familiar with the group, here is a YouTube video of a movement from the Ewald. Acoustics are not the best because it's outside, but the sensitive playing is still evident.

    At around 4:15 in the video below, the cornet plays a short line and then the horn answers it. Such moments show the value of using the upright horn instead of the more common French horn - the upright fits in with the rest of the instruments better (IMHO) because of its greater acoustic clarity.

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  3. #3
    I really enjoyed listening to the Ewald. Question though. Is the tenor horn really a conical instrument? I've heard them called trombones with valves because, I assume, of their less conical trombone-like sound. Just curious. You guys sound great!
    Steve Petrangelo
    Lake Havasu Symphonic Winds (board/treasurer)
    Lake Havasu Regional Orchestra (tuba/board/treasurer)

  4. #4
    A tenor horn is considered conical. The tone is brighter than a French horn because of the mouthpiece and bell, and possibly some other bore differences, but they are conical.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  5. #5
    Aren't tenor horns similar in structure to a Bb British baritone, only pitched higher?

    If I'm not mistaken, the conical nature of both of these horns is more cornet-like, unlike the broader conical nature of fluegelhorns and euphoniums.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by John the Theologian View Post
    Aren't tenor horns similar in structure to a Bb British baritone, only pitched higher?

    If I'm not mistaken, the conical nature of both of these horns is more cornet-like, unlike the broader conical nature of fluegelhorns and euphoniums.
    Good description! (I think my comment was overly broad.)
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  7. I'm looking forward to listening to this! I first heard of the project when Hiram Diaz was on the Brass Junkies podcast and the YouTube videos are great. I completely agree with David's comments. Even with less than ideal recording conditions on the videos, the quality of the musicianship comes through (obvious considering the players). Looking forward to hearing the studio recording.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiramdiaz1 View Post
    Hello all,

    I’d like to introduce the High Bridge Brass, an all conical brass quintet. The quintet’s members are:

    Chris Martin of the New York Philharmonic and Mark Ridenour of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on Cornets.

    Nathan Miller of Asbury University on Tenor Horn

    Hiram Diaz of Washington D.C. on Euphonium

    Chris Tiedeman of Washington D.C. on Tuba


    [snip]The album features Ewald quintets 1 and 3 and the Bohme sextet in their intended instrumentation. Please visit the website for more details about the album and about our upcoming performances! [snip]
    What's the sixth instrument on the Bohme sextet, and who's the performer?
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1, Kadja, and DE 101XTG9 mouthpieces
    Bach 36B trombone; pBone; Vincent Bach (from 1971) 6.5AL mouthpiece
    Steinway 1902 Model A, restored by AC Pianocraft in 1988; Kawai MP8, Yamaha KX-76
    See my avatar: Jazz (the black cockapoo) and Delilah (the cavapoo puppy) keep me company while practicing

  9. #9
    I believe that is Matt Harding, on cornet. He is solo cornetist with "The President's Own" United States Marine Band.
    Last edited by John Morgan; 11-29-2019 at 06:28 PM.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  10. This album has been a lot of fun to listen to. I wasn't familiar with the Bohme piece before this and I think it may be my favorite part of the album, although I have enjoyed it all. I also love the descending cornet runs in the final movement of the Ewald quartet no. 3.

    Is it correct that part of the appeal of performing these pieces on valved conical brass instruments is the "consistent" tone quality from instrument to instrument? It may be my untrained ear and it may be the relatively low quality equipment I've been listening with, but there are times where I feel like I can't initially tell if a part is on the alto horn or euphonium at the higher end of the euphonium range. Same thing for the tuba and euphonium at the lower end if the euphonium range.

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