Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: Suggestions for switching from Treble Clef to Bass Clef

  1. A "cheat sheet" method to read bass clef when coming from treble clef is to take two flats away from bass clef, and begin with reading what would be a G3 in treble clef as a C2 in treble clef, which is a Bb2 in bass clef.
    James Kircoff
    Genesee Wind Symphony - principal euphonium (Adams E3 Custom .60mm yellow brass bell w/ Parker 4G Houser)
    Capital City Brass Band (2019 NABBA 2nd section champions) - 1st baritone (Besson BE956 w/ Denis Wick 6BY) and 10 piece ensemble (Getzen 1052FD bass trombone w/ Bach 1G)

  2. #12
    I started on trumpet in 5th grade and of course, treble clef. In junior high, I switched to baritone (treble clef). When I entered high school, both baritone players (senior and junior, I was a freshman) played bass clef. I learned bass clef pronto the first year. I did mental gymnastics to learn it, and often had both the treble and bass clef parts to look at simultaneously. Eventually, I knew both clefs completely fluently, without having to think, "Okay, for this treble clef note, do this to get the same note in bass clef". I think it is very important for "serious" euphonium players to absolutely read both clefs fluently. Even for the amateur euphonium player who may play only in a community band, I think it is very useful to know both treble and bass. It is surprising how many times you may end up with one or the other clefs in your folder. Sometimes there might ONLY be bass clef. So if you are a "never bass clefer", you are out of luck. And if you only read bass clef, then you will be challenged if you want to play in a British Brass Band (treble clef only for euphonium).

    Also, Dave is right about the trumpet and all of the literature for it. You don't see trumpet in bass clef. And the euphonium can play all of the trumpet literature, so learn treble clef.

    Players will probably end up with a preferred clef if they have a choice. But I always play a little treble clef occasionally just to keep totally fluent. Some band parts have bass clef on one side, and treble on the other for euphonium. I will quite regularly switch those to stay totally fluent.

    Trombone players who read bass and tenor clef will sometimes approach treble clef as if it were tenor clef with two added flats. I am probably the exception in that I approach treble clef on trombone (in a British Brass Band) as strictly treble clef (I don't think tenor clef and 2 extra flats). And I approach tenor clef on trombone as if it were treble clef with two less flats.

    Alto clef is the only clef I have to really engage my brain on since I play it so infrequently. I have to think a lot on alto and I don't know it fluently like I do the others. I should probably practice that more, but most of us euphonium/trombone players will only see alto clef if they are playing the principal trombone part in a symphony.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  3. Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    Alto clef is the only clef I have to really engage my brain on since I play it so infrequently. I have to think a lot on alto and I don't know it fluently like I do the others. I should probably practice that more, but most of us euphonium/trombone players will only see alto clef if they are playing the principal trombone part in a symphony.
    My daughter plays viola, meaning she reads alto clef. When I try to read her parts I have to spend more brain power transposing than actually playing, which ends up with myself making a lot of mistakes.
    James Kircoff
    Genesee Wind Symphony - principal euphonium (Adams E3 Custom .60mm yellow brass bell w/ Parker 4G Houser)
    Capital City Brass Band (2019 NABBA 2nd section champions) - 1st baritone (Besson BE956 w/ Denis Wick 6BY) and 10 piece ensemble (Getzen 1052FD bass trombone w/ Bach 1G)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    658
    Another vote for just learning it. Method book with fingerings.

    Don't think about anything treble, it will just confuse you.

    The nice thing is, you'll never forget how to read treble after bass, sort of like learning another language.

    Dennis
    3 notes and the truth.

    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard, early model Wick 4AL
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1917 Conn C/D/Eb mellophone original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original, Bach 5GS

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •