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Thread: Dr. Brian Bowman - Marcello Sonata in F Major - 2019

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Dr. Brian Bowman - Marcello Sonata in F Major - 2019

    Hi,

    I saw this video and am posting here is brands to ask if you know which model this Euphonium is. I know that Dr. Bowman is a Willson player but I can't tell if this is a 2900 or a 2950 and whether it is medium or large shank. What do you see? ( I know there are some very knowledgeable folks here)

    The second part of this post is just to mention that as I age I become more aware of how difficult brass musicians have it compared to others. The brass instrument is very physical. I have heard Dr. Bowman perform many times but mostly in the 1980s and 90s. I have his Carnegie Hall recital CD. I have been a tuba player for 40 years but am playing more trombone and euphonium now than tuba. I have noticed that albeit a small change that my lung capacity is less than it used to be and I notice subtle changes as I age. (mid 50s here). There are some older players on this forum as well. What differences and changes have you noticed?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0q0thvyrExYv
    John 3:16

    Yamaha YSL-630 Trombone
    Conn 15I Euphonium
    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    3,139
    To my knowledge Dr. Bowman has always played the 2900 with a Euro or medium shank lead pipe. Looks like the BB1 mpc too. Excellent video. Thanks for sharing.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

  3. #3
    Rick got here first, but my answer is exactly the same. BTW, on a recent video he even extolled the virtues of the medium shank on a euphonium.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
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    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. #4
    I learned that piece for the IET Geezer Group solo competition in 2016. At home, I recorded the accompaniment, but instead of using Finale's piano sound, I used a harpsichord. The accompaniment sounds better listen than my playing does.

    (I don't know who shot the videos this year, but that's some good camera work.)

    D
    David Bjornstad

    1923 Conn New Wonder 86I, Bach 6 1/2 AL
    2018 Wessex EP100 Dolce, Denis Wick 4ABL
    2013 Jinbao JBEP-1111L, Denis Wick 4AM
    2015 Jinbao JBBR-1240, Denis Wick clone mouthpiece of unknown designation
    Cullman (AL) Community Band (Euph Section Leader)
    Brass Band of Huntsville (2nd Bari)

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus1 View Post
    ...The second part of this post is just to mention that as I age I become more aware of how difficult brass musicians have it compared to others. The brass instrument is very physical. I have heard Dr. Bowman perform many times but mostly in the 1980s and 90s. I have his Carnegie Hall recital CD. I have been a tuba player for 40 years but am playing more trombone and euphonium now than tuba. I have noticed that albeit a small change that my lung capacity is less than it used to be and I notice subtle changes as I age. (mid 50s here). There are some older players on this forum as well. What differences and changes have you noticed?...
    Well, age certainly can play a part in your playing. However, if you are in good health, I contend that you can play at a fairly high level (relative to your own playing proficiency over your life) well into your senior years. I am close to 72 and started playing when I was 9 years old (5th grade for me). I also had the bad habit of smoking up until 7 years ago (about 50 years worth). So, I do suffer from not having the lung capacity that I did when younger. My lung capacity is surely less than other 72 year old players who never smoked and are in otherwise good health. What I have noticed as I grow older is that it takes probably a little more practice to stay sharp on the horn. I have lost a little dexterity and speed over the years, but not much. I constantly play scales and lip slurs and tonguing exercises to keep my technique close to where it was when in my 20's and 30's. My range is equal to, if not a wee bit better, than it was many years ago, probably because I learned "how" to play higher. My endurance is pretty good, also, due to playing most every day.

    I am sure that at some point, my playing will fall off, perhaps precipitously, but hopefully it will be gradual. I think if you have groups and ensembles to play in, keep practicing and try to learn new things (certainly new music), stay interested and involved, that you can play well into your senior years and perhaps very senior years. You just have to want to do it. But if you do have health issues, that can certainly put a damper on things.

    I have no plans to quit playing at any point in the future, no matter how old I get.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    Well, age certainly can play a part in your playing. However, if you are in good health, I contend that you can play at a fairly high level (relative to your own playing proficiency over your life) well into your senior years. I am close to 72 and started playing when I was 9 years old (5th grade for me). I also had the bad habit of smoking up until 7 years ago (about 50 years worth). So, I do suffer from not having the lung capacity that I did when younger. My lung capacity is surely less than other 72 year old players who never smoked and are in otherwise good health. What I have noticed as I grow older is that it takes probably a little more practice to stay sharp on the horn. I have lost a little dexterity and speed over the years, but not much. I constantly play scales and lip slurs and tonguing exercises to keep my technique close to where it was when in my 20's and 30's. My range is equal to, if not a wee bit better, than it was many years ago, probably because I learned "how" to play higher. My endurance is pretty good, also, due to playing most every day.

    I am sure that at some point, my playing will fall off, perhaps precipitously, but hopefully it will be gradual. I think if you have groups and ensembles to play in, keep practicing and try to learn new things (certainly new music), stay interested and involved, that you can play well into your senior years and perhaps very senior years. You just have to want to do it. But if you do have health issues, that can certainly put a damper on things.

    I have no plans to quit playing at any point in the future, no matter how old I get.
    Thanks for the reply John. I am in reasonably good health for which I'm thankful. I smoked briefly in the early 80s for about 3 years and then quit which I am also thankful. Getting the practice time I guess is the real challenge! When in the Army I played for a living and had plenty of time to both perform and practice. Not the case anymore. The practice time that I do get gets focused on the areas that you mentioned; scales and long tones etc. It is encouraging to know that you feel that was in your 70s! That's terrific. I don't do the soloing that it sounds like you do with your groups. I play weekly in church and am in a couple of community groups. I will say that the older I get the more I appreciate the privilege of playing and am just thankful to enjoy music.
    John 3:16

    Yamaha YSL-630 Trombone
    Conn 15I Euphonium
    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Leadwood, MO
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveBj View Post
    I learned that piece for the IET Geezer Group solo competition in 2016. At home, I recorded the accompaniment, but instead of using Finale's piano sound, I used a harpsichord. The accompaniment sounds better listen than my playing does.

    (I don't know who shot the videos this year, but that's some good camera work.)

    D
    Nice! I bet it was a fun piece to learn.
    John 3:16

    Yamaha YSL-630 Trombone
    Conn 15I Euphonium
    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus1 View Post
    Nice! I bet it was a fun piece to learn.
    It was, and I still like to take it out and play it. What's really nice about that edition (Adam Frey's) is that the piece itself is pretty vanilla, but Adam includes a small tutorial on ornamentation, and you can basically insert whatever ornamentation you want to spice it up, just like they did when it was originally written. As I was preparing, I watched a video of cello players, and they almost had more ornamentation than written notes
    David Bjornstad

    1923 Conn New Wonder 86I, Bach 6 1/2 AL
    2018 Wessex EP100 Dolce, Denis Wick 4ABL
    2013 Jinbao JBEP-1111L, Denis Wick 4AM
    2015 Jinbao JBBR-1240, Denis Wick clone mouthpiece of unknown designation
    Cullman (AL) Community Band (Euph Section Leader)
    Brass Band of Huntsville (2nd Bari)

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