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Thread: Some opinions needed-

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    US East coast
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    Some opinions needed-

    Iím giving an instrument a trial-before-purchasing, and Iíve been positively impressed with it. I find myself getting a little more out of it every time I do my daily practicing.

    I have a question though. For a few specifically ergonomic reasons, Iíve found that I need to put my left foot on an elevated footrest to hold the instrument with minimum tension in my arms, hands, and fingers/thumb.

    Using the footrest, the instrument is balanced comfortably on my lap. Would my footrest fall into the same category as a tuba or baritone sax rest, or other kinds of assists I see other musicians using?

    Iím not as concerned about the appearance as I am about making a bad habit.

    Thanks for your input.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by ann reid View Post
    [snip] I have a question though. For a few specifically ergonomic reasons, I’ve found that I need to put my left foot on an elevated footrest to hold the instrument with minimum tension in my arms, hands, and fingers/thumb.

    Using the footrest, the instrument is balanced comfortably on my lap. Would my footrest fall into the same category as a tuba or baritone sax rest, or other kinds of assists I see other musicians using? [snip]
    Many euphonium players use a small pillow on their laps, to raise the height of the instrument. I use one made by QHR, which looks quite professional - it included foam inserts of different thicknesses to adjust the height.

    The only problem I'd see with a footrest is whether playing with one raised leg affects your posture, which in turn would affect your airflow.
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1, Kadja, and DE 101XTG9 mouthpieces
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
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    3,162
    I agree with 'dsurkin' using a small pillow. I've used one for years on my left hip to elevate the horn some. I found a small (9" x 5") felt bag with drawstring closure and partially filled it with the polyester pillow stuffing. Then tighten the string and stuff that into the small opening. It can be adjusted easily as it compresses. When I put my horn away in its case I just put the pillow in its bell.
    Rick Floyd
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    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by ann reid View Post
    Iím giving an instrument a trial-before-purchasing, and Iíve been positively impressed with it. I find myself getting a little more out of it every time I do my daily practicing.

    I have a question though. For a few specifically ergonomic reasons, Iíve found that I need to put my left foot on an elevated footrest to hold the instrument with minimum tension in my arms, hands, and fingers/thumb.

    Using the footrest, the instrument is balanced comfortably on my lap. Would my footrest fall into the same category as a tuba or baritone sax rest, or other kinds of assists I see other musicians using?

    Iím not as concerned about the appearance as I am about making a bad habit.

    Thanks for your input.
    This works very well.

    http://stores.quickhornrinse.com/lpt...onium-lap-pad/

    Mike

  5. I prefer to NOT use a lap pad or pillow. I use a "guitar foot rest" under my left foot at my home studio. I often prop my left foot up on the leg of a chair by raising my heel against thee left front chair leg. I have tried many other solutions including a Dee Stewart peg and others. In the end, a foot rest worked best for me.

    I think that whatever works for you is fine.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Anderson, Indiana
    Posts
    218
    While visiting the Quick Horn Rinse website to look at their lap pillow, you might also take a look at the euphonium hand strap. Many of us like this option. A similar hand strap is also available from http://comfyhornstrap.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Well, I don't use any foot rest or lap pillow with the euphonium, although I admit when I play guitar (in a guitar flute duet), I do use a footrest. For the euphonium, I just simply like it so much, that I pick it up and grab it (hold it) without resting it on anything. I do a lot of my practicing standing up, so not much use of a footrest or lap pillow for that scenario. Guess I just grew up without one and never decided to get one. I do not slouch over and let my euphonium sit on my left leg, I hold it. I sometimes do the method described by "daruby" with the left heel against the front chair leg. But not too often. Maybe when I get old, things will change. Is going on 72 old?
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    Is going on 72 old?
    No. But 72 is old. You'll see.

    (Although now that I got my back fixed, I really feel no older than ... well ... maybe 65. It's just the comorbidities that get you at an accelerating rate. They circle you like a pack of wolves, and as you fend off some of them, others sneak up behind and attack. Also, you do end up paying for your sins -- and your fun -- at some point. )
    Gary Merrill
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    US East coast
    Posts
    29
    Thanks for your replies! The problem isn’t the instrument height. It’s the way it’s out of balance in my lap.

    Since I’m probably the oldest here I can’t discount the creaky joints factor either. Then there’s going from a four pound horn to one that’s almost 10.

    I’ve begun to enjoy it more every time I’ve played it, and played it a couple times for a solid 1 1/2 hours, so that’s definitely a strong point in its favor.

    I also attempt to sit tall, away from the back of the chair when I play, and I can’t notice any problems with my breathing.

    Still hoping it may be a keeper.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ghmerrill View Post
    No. But 72 is old. You'll see.

    (Although now that I got my back fixed, I really feel no older than ... well ... maybe 65. It's just the comorbidities that get you at an accelerating rate. They circle you like a pack of wolves, and as you fend off some of them, others sneak up behind and attack. Also, you do end up paying for your sins -- and your fun -- at some point. )
    That's funny. And probably unfortunately, true.... Alas.... I am clearly paying for my sins regarding smoking like a chimney for so many years I would need 2 1/2 times the number of fingers and toes I currently have (and last time I checked, I had the normal compliment) to count the smoking years. But so far, I can still play pretty okay, much to my total disbelief. I do practice enough to keep Linda in a perpetual state of something not normal.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

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