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Thread: Double Tonguing scales?

  1. #1

    Double Tonguing scales?

    I've recently just realized I could be appying double tonguing to my scales and play them much faster than single-tonguing would allow. Now I believe that it sounds much more effortless in recordings compared to single-tonguing at certain tempos. My question is, would this be a good thing to apply at auditions such as All-State, College auditions, etc? And what more can I do to perfect this technique and apply it to different areas of practice or just general playing?

  2. #2
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    I think this is a good exercise to get your double tonguing coordinated with fingering. Not sure it should be used all the time. It’s always good to get your single tonguing as fast as possible.
    Rick Floyd
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  3. #3
    I will choose to use double-tongue at times when I COULD single-tongue, but the double sounds more "facile." But as Rick said, you need to work with the goal of making it impossible for someone to tell if you are in single or double mode. Check out my warm up video at this time stamp:

    https://youtu.be/QqPql-Sh-7w?t=1452
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by RickF View Post
    I think this is a good exercise to get your double tonguing coordinated with fingering. Not sure it should be used all the time. Itís always good to get your single tonguing as fast as possible.
    I see, it's very true that I should be working on making my single tonguing faster. I just wish to see whether or not double tonguing can be used in places where it sounds cleaner, but both ways should be possible to play and sound clean nonetheless
    Last edited by Beef; 08-27-2019 at 11:34 AM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    I will choose to use double-tongue at times when I COULD single-tongue, but the double sounds more "facile." But as Rick said, you need to work with the goal of making it impossible for someone to tell if you are in single or double mode. Check out my warm up video at this time stamp:

    https://youtu.be/QqPql-Sh-7w?t=1452
    Wow, where has this video been my whole life? Thank you!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Beef View Post
    I've recently just realized I could be appying double tonguing to my scales and play them much faster than single-tonguing would allow. Now I believe that it sounds much more effortless in recordings compared to single-tonguing at certain tempos. My question is, would this be a good thing to apply at auditions such as All-State, College auditions, etc? And what more can I do to perfect this technique and apply it to different areas of practice or just general playing?
    One of the best books to have is the Arban's Complete Method. There is a ton of stuff in there on multiple tonguing. And beyond that, you can go to the scales section and practice much of that using multiple tonguing. If you are really ambitious, try learning the multiple tonguing exercises that jump around and are not just simple scale passages.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    One of the best books to have is the Arban's Complete Method. There is a ton of stuff in there on multiple tonguing. And beyond that, you can go to the scales section and practice much of that using multiple tonguing. If you are really ambitious, try learning the multiple tonguing exercises that jump around and are not just simple scale passages.
    I do in fact have the the Arban's! The Joe Alessi & Brian Bowman one. Thank you for referring to those chapters too! I keep forgetting I can apply skills I learn in each chapter to every chapter. It gets pretty annoying sometimes.
    Last edited by Beef; 08-27-2019 at 04:58 PM.

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