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Thread: 3 + 1 vs. 4 Inline (valves)

  1. #11
    I played an euphonium with the four valves in line for twenty years and I didn't have any particular problems. Now, since 2007, I play on 3+1 euph: it took me a few months to synchronize the two hands, but then I must say that the latter is certainly better ( ring finger and little finger are activated together). I happened to play again on 4 in line rush and old habit was automatically returned. If you do the reverse passage ( from 3+1 to 4 ) you can safely operate the 4th valve with the index finger of your left hand.
    Besson Prestige 2052,3D K&G mouthpiece;JP373 baritone,T4C K&G mouthpiece;Bach 42GO trombone,T4C K&G mouthpiece

  2. Quote Originally Posted by highpitch View Post
    3+1 tubas rule in the brass band world. So do players with long arms...

    DG
    Should I ever get a tuba, I will most likely look for a 3+1. Question is... Eb or Bb. I also play guitar and electric bass, and while I've tried very hard to build up my pinky, even my teacher says it's really only good for chords and as part of a run. Trills, bends, etc are not really pinky friendly, and farther up the neck for melodic lines, often the pinky is omitted.
    Sterling / Perantucci 1065HGS Euphonium, Yamaha YBB-631S BBb Tuba, and a bunch of trombones.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    657
    Bb tubas play in more places.

    DG
    3 notes and the truth.

    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard, early model Wick 4AL
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1917 Conn C/D/Eb mellophone original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original, Bach 5GS

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,000
    You mean like more places in the music? Or more shady places like bars, parties, bandas, etc?
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    657
    Why, the latter, of course!

    Ha!

    DG
    3 notes and the truth.

    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard, early model Wick 4AL
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1917 Conn C/D/Eb mellophone original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original, Bach 5GS

  6. #16
    I own, and use a Besson NS 3+1, along with a Hirsbrunner. However, my preference, if I'm just doing simple band music, or marches, is to reach for the 321. While the horn is an inline 4, one can elect to play the 4th valve with the left hand index finger. Several talented musicians have played the 321, and I've seen Dee Stewart do it over the years, flawlessly.

    Factoring in medical concerns, the 321 just takes less work to play, versus my other 3+1's.

    I've also got the biggest pair of hands on this forum. So that inline 4th valve isn't a problem. We all come in very different shapes and sizes, and the horn market is rich and diverse with options. And a good tech can make any configuration suitable.

  7. #17
    Markmc611,

    One thing that probably enters into it for your comparison is that the 321 has a .570" bore, vs. more other horns today (in the 3+1 realm) that have .592. Even the older Bessons had a .580. (The old American horns were about .560.)
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Markmc611,

    One thing that probably enters into it for your comparison is that the 321 has a .570" bore, vs. more other horns today (in the 3+1 realm) that have .592. Even the older Bessons had a .580. (The old American horns were about .560.)
    I realized that at the moment I posted. But I wasn't quite sure about the Besson. Thanks for making that clear, Dave.

  9. #19
    "Because back in the day, a guy named Blaikley was the first one to put it into use in horn construction. (I would love to have a year on this innovation, by the way.)"

    David Blaikley of Boosey & Co. invented the compensated euphonium in 1874 and the patent did not expire until the 1970's, which is why only Besson had a compensated euphonium until after the patent expired.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by franz View Post
    If you do the reverse passage ( from 3+1 to 4 ) you can safely operate the 4th valve with the index finger of your left hand.
    I did that when my main euph was under maintenance and I got a 4-inline Yamaha clone as a borrowing instrument until it was finished... my entire posture went to hell because of the unnatural position of the left hand, because suddenly the part of my body that carried the most amount of weight was in a position where it couldn't carry that weight anymore. Left hand and shoulder cramped up, position of my euph was terrible, etc. Never gonna try that again xD

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