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Thread: 3 + 1 vs. 4 Inline (valves)

  1. #41
    I think it was in 1980 that I saw a performer using a Miraphone compensating euph (their first model). He had a factory option of a trigger, but it worked the 1st and 3rd slides simultaneously. Simpler and clever in its own way. Didn't catch on, though.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
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  2. Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    Tuba players, particularly of american style front-action tubas, have a long tradition of manipulating slides while they play to adjust intonation. The models that come with straps on the tuning slides aren't necessarily elastic to bring them back to home position, I believe they are to prevent the player from pulling to far and either pulling the slide off or getting it to the point where it could become jammed.
    Ahhh, now I see. I've seen the adjusting before, but just hadn't seen many people with the string before. I had noticed that most tubas have the first valve slide pointing upwards, so it can be easily manipulated. I also played with a tuba player who was using a F tuba with a 2nd valve slide trigger. That was definitely interesting to see.
    Sterling / Perantucci 1065HGS - Hammond 11L , Bach 42T - Laskey 59MD, Kanstul 1588CR - Hammond 11ML, Yamaha YBL-612 RII - Faxx 1 1/2G

  3. #43
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    "Chris Olka is an excellent example of playing a tuba with these strings." (RickF)

    I think I am jealous of how effortless and smooth his slides seem to work. It barely seems that he is pushing or pulling on them at all. I wonder what his secret, and choice of lube, is.
    - Sara
    Baritone - 3 Valve, Compensating, JinBao JBBR1240

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Sara Hood View Post
    I think I am jealous of how effortless and smooth his slides seem to work. It barely seems that he is pushing or pulling on them at all. I wonder what his secret, and choice of lube, is.
    - Sara
    Most likely, his secret is a tech that lapped the slides for him, making them smoother and decreasing the diameter just a bit. That would make them easier to move, and then he probably uses "Slide Oil" instead of "Slide Gel" or "Grease".

    I had the opposite problem on a trombone, and the tech just put a dent ball inside one leg, increasing the diameter ever so slightly.
    Sterling / Perantucci 1065HGS - Hammond 11L , Bach 42T - Laskey 59MD, Kanstul 1588CR - Hammond 11ML, Yamaha YBL-612 RII - Faxx 1 1/2G

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbonesullivan View Post
    Most likely, his secret is a tech that lapped the slides for him, making them smoother and decreasing the diameter just a bit. That would make them easier to move, and then he probably uses "Slide Oil" instead of "Slide Gel" or "Grease".
    Yes, this is what I did (i.e., I did it -- not a tech) to the 1st valve slide on my Cerveny 781 BBb horn. It's quite simple to do IF the slide legs are really parallel. I then used standard valve oil (Alisyn in my case) as the lubricant. Care must be taken in the lapping since you want it to work smoothly and easily, with virtually no effort, but to remain in place if you let it go or set it for "standard tuning". It should not be as loose/slick as a trombone hand slide. Finally, it's absolutely silly to do this unless you vent the valve for that slide. However, once all that's done on a standard German/Czech-style tuba, then your hand rests on the top bow and you can use the 1st valve slide to dynamically tune as needed. It worked so well that for any valve combinations involving the 1st valve I rarely used the 4th valve and confined it's use almost solely to the low range where it was really needed to lower the pitch. 4th valve combinations for "alternate fingerings" in order to adjust pitch in all registers except the contra one were generally eliminated.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  6. #46
    It's also very helpful if the inner and outer tubes are truly parallel. Lots of brand new high-end instruments are parallel and aligned enough so that they are usable, but not good enough that they will work smoothly once lapped like this.
    --
    Barry

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sara Hood View Post
    "Chris Olka is an excellent example of playing a tuba with these strings." (RickF)

    I think I am jealous of how effortless and smooth his slides seem to work. It barely seems that he is pushing or pulling on them at all. I wonder what his secret, and choice of lube, is.
    - Sara
    Pretty sure Mr. Olka uses Resilience Oil products. Probably the 'kicker slide' lube.
    See his review of Resilience Oil from Sept. 2018.
    ...
    Rick Floyd
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