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Thread: Identifying Mead springs

  1. #1

    Identifying Mead springs

    My tech put my Mead springs together in a bag. Is there anyway to tell them apart? They all look about the same to me.

    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Oh no! They usually come with paper inserted inserted in the spring labeling #1, which should be the strongest. Hopefully you can tell the difference by just compressing each one between your fingers which is stronger.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
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  3. #3
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    The "regular" Mead springs are 1-2-3-4 in order of length...longest=1st, etc.
    The "loose" Mead springs are interchangeable for 1-2-3.

    I've got both sets.

    Jim
    Last edited by Snorlax; 06-02-2019 at 07:08 PM.
    Yamaha 642-II Neo, Wedge 103A/Wick 4AL
    Yamaha 321, Yamaha 621 Baritone
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  4. #4
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    Thanks Jim. Didn't know that. Learn something new everyday.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    My thoughts about this, after I tried them in my euph, were that if you couldn't tell the difference by trying them and switching them around, then exactly what was the point of it all? They're in my old Eb tuba now -- at least that's where I think I put them. But maybe I switched them out for Yamahas. I should check, eh?
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Snorlax View Post
    The "regular" Mead springs are 1-2-3-4 in order of length...longest=1st, etc.
    The "loose" Mead springs are interchangeable.

    I've got both sets.

    Jim
    I see the problem with my original question. I have the light mead springs. I was assuming that they are the same as the regular ones, only lighter. But, the regular have 4 different strengths, where the light have 3 that are the same and a different one for the fourth valve. My set has one that is longer than the rest, so I guess that's the one for the fourth valve.

    Mike

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    You may have the regular strength springs, in which case the longest spring belongs to the FIRST valve. The regular set has only slight difference between 2 and 3. The fourth spring should not be the longest.
    Howzabout some pixx??
    Yamaha 642-II Neo, Wedge 103A/Wick 4AL
    Yamaha 321, Yamaha 621 Baritone
    Conn 50H trombone
    Blue P-bone
    www.soundcloud.com/jweuph

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