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Thread: Doubling on Bass Trombone and Euphonium (Mouthpieces)

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    Right. I suggested above that a 1.5 is too small for orchestral bass trombone playing, but it's just right for someone who's just getting started with orchestral bass trombone playing. (Of course, back in the day players like Ray Premru sounded fantastic with smaller mouthpieces! But the general trend towards heavier equipment and larger mouthpieces has moved past that approach) I think the Faxx 1.5G suggestion is great.
    Id agree with the 1.5 suggestion, but try multiple mouthpieces in that range. I absolutely hated the Bach 1.5, and liked other 1.5’s.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ghmerrill View Post
    Just out of curiosity, what does HE play? Does he play trombone, for example?
    My teacher is Tony Clements the tuba player in the Symphony Silicon Valley. He plays multiple instruments, but maybe he just doesn't have confidence in the flexibility of my chops.
    Natalie Colegrove
    Kanstul 975 Euphonium
    Honor Band of America 2019
    @euphieslife

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexS View Post
    In my opinion, it's easier to get a characteristic sound using a characteristic mouthpiece like a 4-5g on euph and a 1 1/2g maybe 2 on bass bone. You've got a better chance confusing your embouchure by thinking about it too much compared to swapping mouthpieces. Music is all about sound not face tissue.

    AlexS
    Would you recommend any exercises to help swapping between mouthpieces?
    Natalie Colegrove
    Kanstul 975 Euphonium
    Honor Band of America 2019
    @euphieslife

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    California
    Posts
    11
    I usually warm up/ do fundamentals on both if I need to play both during a day or focus on whichever one I need more that day. A simple thing to do is buzz melodies, arpeggios, or exercises on both mouthpieces (basics plus, and brass gym have buzzing exercises, but don't overdo it). I like to start on bass trombone because it's an airhog and gets you using full, relaxed breaths right way. Bass trombone won't help you sound good the same way euphonium will; it'll keep you honest on air. Play basic scales, Arban's, Rochut's and melodies on both horns. Face isn't the biggest difference between instruments to me, it's the nuances in how I use my air. I will say that I sometimes have more of a hitch going from big to small mouthpiece, but if I have my ideal sound in my head it'll work itself out with buzzing or long tones.

    Just don't overthink it. If you think that going between different sized mouthpieces is a big deal, you'll make it a big deal. Check out Arnold Jacobs and his teachings, I think they'll apply very well in this situation. Listen to your heroes religiously on both and try to play music like they would. Work on your real life sound and how vividly you can imagine your ideal sound every day. It's a process, don't get discouraged if it's not going as fast as you'd like or if you take the occasional step backward it happens to everyone.
    Practice SMART, practice hard, and find out what works for you.
    AlexS

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by mscolegrove View Post
    My teacher is Tony Clements the tuba player in the Symphony Silicon Valley. He plays multiple instruments, but maybe he just doesn't have confidence in the flexibility of my chops.
    Tony is a very smart and accomplished musician and teacher. He almost certainly has a reason for advising you the way he did. If it's something you're not trusting yet, it's worth a further conversation with him.
    Adrian L. Quince
    Composer, Conductor, Euphoniumist
    www.adrianquince.com

    Kanstul 976 - SM4U

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,958
    Quote Originally Posted by adrian_quince View Post
    Tony is a very smart and accomplished musician and teacher. He almost certainly has a reason for advising you the way he did. If it's something you're not trusting yet, it's worth a further conversation with him.
    Absolutely. This changes the situation from generic advice offered by a "music teacher" to specific advice from an experienced low brass professional to a particular student. To me it means that he's not suggesting that you NEVER move to doubling on bass trombone, but that AT THE MOMENT your progress in developing your skills would be deterred by doing that. I'd listen to him and delay changes for the time being.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

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