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Thread: First impressions of my new silver Wessex Dolce

  1. #11
    This review of the Wessex reminds me of a couple of things on my Mack Brass, a cousin to the Wessex.

    I had a bit of trouble with the top valve caps on my Mack Brass, but I put slide grease on the threads and carefully screwed them on and have had no trouble as long as I'm careful.

    Also I've had to be careful taking the 1st valve out because it's so close to the bell. Every time I take that valve out, I put a microfiber cloth between the valve and the bell to cushion it. I would recommend this to anyone who has a Jinbao or Jinbao stencil horn. I'm assuming that the Yamahas that were the model for this horn had the same issue.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by John the Theologian View Post
    Also I've had to be careful taking the 1st valve out because it's so close to the bell. Every time I take that valve out, I put a microfiber cloth between the valve and the bell to cushion it. I would recommend this to anyone who has a Jinbao or Jinbao stencil horn. I'm assuming that the Yamahas that were the model for this horn had the same issue.
    My Adams is pretty close in this regard, too. When I remove my 1st valve I make sure my hand is positioned so that if it "pops" out suddenly I'll personally cushion the blow!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  3. #13
    I use my hand as well, but the cloth is my "extra insurance."

    Sometimes, I pull the valve out about 90% and apply valve oil without taking it all the way out. I'm always worried about banging the valve against bell due to the tight fit.

  4. I have been using my hand, but the cloth is a great idea! And I too try to leave the valves in just a little bit when I oil.

    I can report some success with the techniques you all described for screwing that third valve cap! Yesterday, I threaded it correctly on the first try! I don't think it will always happen like that, but I'm happy for the progress.
    Wessex Dolce

    "Suppose we have only dreamed, or made up, all those things -- trees and grass and sun and moon and stars and Aslan himself. Suppose we have. Then all I can say is that, in that case, the made-up things seem a good deal more important than the real ones." - Puddleglum in "The Silver Chair"

  5. #15
    As a rookie band director I was lucky to have a 30 year veteran nearby and he taught me that one of the most important things to do with new brass instruments is to flush out the insides frequently the first few weeks of service. I've always done that and have had few problems with my horns.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    I may have a few other thoughts later, but for now I'll direct you to this video, where I show my own technique for dealing with the valve caps without cross-threading anything:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhMzkgQQtSw
    This really is a golden tip! This will save me minutes everytime I oil my valves.

    Thanks!

  7. #17
    Very nice review! I haven’t ordered mine yet, but will do so shortly; and now I have an idea of what to expect!
    Question: did you get the straight silver one or the silver/gold one?

    Also question for others: on the website, they say that there will be a Gold Brass bell one available at the end of March...Is this meaning that the bell is made of Gold brass versus yellow brass, or is this implying simply a lacquered instrument?

    Thanks
    “The greater the artist, the greater the doubt. Perfect confidence is granted to the less talented as a consolation prize.” -Robert Hughes

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by PastorAtrain View Post
    Also question for others: on the website, they say that there will be a Gold Brass bell one available at the end of March...Is this meaning that the bell is made of Gold brass versus yellow brass, or is this implying simply a lacquered instrument?
    I think that means a gold-alloy brass, which has more copper. I suspect I would like that one, but I have not tried it.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  9. Quote Originally Posted by PastorAtrain View Post

    Also question for others: on the website, they say that there will be a Gold Brass bell one available at the end of March...Is this meaning that the bell is made of Gold brass versus yellow brass, or is this implying simply a lacquered instrument?

    Thanks
    It means the bell is made of gold brass - which in Wessex case is 84% copper
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  10. #20
    This implies that when "gold brass" is specified, the 84% copper 14% zinc brass is clear lacquered, instead of being silver plated.

    Regards, Guido
    Last edited by guidocorona; 03-18-2019 at 06:10 PM.
    Euph - Wessex EP104 Festivo - SM4U
    Flugel - Kanstul 1525
    Trpt - Adams A4 LB
    Bb Cornet -Carolbrass CCR-7772R-GSS
    Eb Cornet - Carolbrass CCR-7775-GSS

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