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Thread: Draining Slides

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    After practicing today I notice that I do sometimes pull the 1st slide. It's easier due to my confined practice area.

    Emptying a slide while playing a solo in front of the band can be tricky. I don't solo in front of the band very often anymore but I remember Fred Dart suggesting to me, "...if you have enough time during the rest, turn to face the band while they're playing and dump the water – hoping not to hit your shoes".
    Rick Floyd
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    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
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  2. #12
    I drain the condensation from my Besson 2052 from the key on the main slide, while in the others I prefer to empty extracting them. On the baritone, which requires more frequent emptying, I do it from the keys, except on the second slide that has no a key. Interesting is a video of Misa Mead where she plays " Fantasia di concerto" where, in a short pause, she discharges the condensation from the main slide unlatching and re-hooking the trigger rod of her Besson Sovreign. (6:35)

    Besson Prestige 2052,3D K&G mouthpiece;JP373 baritone,T4C K&G mouthpiece;Bach 42GO trombone,T4C K&G mouthpiece

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by franz View Post
    Interesting is a video of Misa Mead where she plays " Fantasia di concerto" where, in a short pause, she discharges the condensation from the main slide unlatching and re-hooking the trigger rod of her Besson Sovreign. (6:35)
    Interesting indeed! I wonder if her main water key had a problem (like a broken spring so it had to be "tied" shut). It was actually a great show of dexterity!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
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    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. #14
    I have a question to ask: do the water keys influence the sound of the horn? I recently saw, I don't remember where, an euphonium player who replaced, on his Adams, the original slides with others without any water key: he claimed to be able to feel the difference.
    Besson Prestige 2052,3D K&G mouthpiece;JP373 baritone,T4C K&G mouthpiece;Bach 42GO trombone,T4C K&G mouthpiece

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by franz View Post
    I have a question to ask: do the water keys influence the sound of the horn? I recently saw, I don't remember where, an euphonium player who replaced, on his Adams, the original slides with others without any water key: he claimed to be able to feel the difference.
    In theory it would matter. I conventional water key has a hole in the slide with a little tube attached, the end of which is sealed by the water key's pad. That's a pothole in the passageway. On my Adams I had all the water keys replaced with Amado keys, with equates to a pothole that was patched. There is still a little dip in the road, but it is very slight. I have a dual set of slides, the other set having conventional water keys. I really can't say I feel a difference, but I can't say I don't either. If there is a difference it's very subtle. But subtle differences here and there can add up. Mostly I just think they look cleaner! I think they are also a bit quicker to empty because of the way I have mine oriented, but that is also a very small thing.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
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    People will say that they feel a difference in all sorts of things -- if they already know (or think) there's some kind of difference. Double blind experiments in such cases normally reveal that they really can't tell the difference. Human nature. Similar to placebo effect. People will believe thing they want to believe.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    On my Adams I had all the water keys replaced with Amado keys, ... Mostly I just think they look cleaner! I think they are also a bit quicker to empty because of the way I have mine oriented, but that is also a very small thing.
    In general they're not as efficient as classic lever-style keys because the hole is smaller. But they work well on trumpets and euphs. I put them on my 1924 tuba and they're great (but I drilled out the hole one drill size larger). Another advantage is that while it takes some experience and skill to install a regular water key and get it right, installing an Amado is simplicity itself. The only trick is to remember to keep it well lubricated.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  8. #18
    Willson euphs have a rubber plug-like thing instead of a cork which goes into the holes so it completely closes off the hole (and little tube attached to it), I would imagine it goes up to the inside of the slide so no air disturbances would happen.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by TheJH View Post
    Willson euphs have a rubber plug-like thing instead of a cork which goes into the holes so it completely closes off the hole (and little tube attached to it), I would imagine it goes up to the inside of the slide so no air disturbances would happen.
    I'd forgotten about that. Yes, I expect it would help reduce turbulence, perhaps as much as an Amado key or even more. The plug would have to have a little clearance to move freely, but if made right it could make a pretty good fit.

    So that shows that Willson believes it is worth the effort to reduce the pothole effect, I think. At least, I can't think of any other advantage to the little extension.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

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