Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Besson 1065 vs 165

  1. Besson 1065 vs 165

    For a high-school freshman, looking to purchase a step-up 3 + 1 non-compensating euphonium from his current 3-valve Holton.

    The Besson site still has pictures that show 1065 on the bell on the page for the 165.

    Has anyone compared the BE1065 to the new BE165?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,442
    Hi 'BHHoward'. Welcome to the forum.

    Pretty sure you're not being ignored. I suspect members here may not know the answer to your question. I've not played either of the Besson models you mention. I searched the internet to see if the 1065 and 165 were the same horn and can't find that out either. Hopefully someone here will know something about those models.
    Last edited by RickF; 01-03-2019 at 05:54 PM.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    Russian Sailor's Dance (Reinhold Gliere
    )

  3. #3
    Back in the 1980's I tried a 4-valve non-compensating euphonium, which was presumably one of those model numbers. It was a nice horn - tone was good and it played easily. I have heard rumors that Besson moved production to India for a while and that those horns were not good quality, but I don't know that from personal experience. That's about the extent of my knowledge!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    200
    Besson has changed quite a bit in their lineup - for example, the Besson International models (BE7(0)65). They were intermediate level non-compensating 3+1 euphs. The ones made in the late 90s were, excuser le mot, crap. One of my fellow euph players plays it and it's horrible. Very light, bad projection, horrible tuning. Then the Internationals made in the early to mid-2000s were pretty good, I played on one for several years. Tuning was WAY better and it was heavier. Projected way better as well. Then that model stopped being produced, and now the International range is back but as an intermediate level compensating model, with the same model number. Even though it's not shown on the Besson site.

    I wouldn't be surprised if the same thing has happened to the 165/1065, same principle horn with technically the same model number, just with a couple of design and quality changes (improvements?) now.

  5. The best step-up for the money is a Wessex Dolce, and it is compensating as well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis area
    Posts
    907
    In addition to Wessex, the Mack Brass 1150 is also a fine step-up--also compensating.
    Jim Williams N9EJR (love 10 meters)
    Yamaha 642-II Neo, Wedge 103E, SM3.5
    Yamaha 321, Yamaha 621 Baritone
    Conn 50H trombone
    Blue P-bone
    www.soundcloud.com/jweuph

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Summerville (SC)
    Posts
    249
    My recommendation would for Wessex Dolce as well... It is getting very good reviewe on this board for quality construction and intonations... For just a smidgeon below $1300 you will get a compensating eupho with standard 3+1 piston configuration.... No, I do not own Dolce.... I have the Wessex Festivo instead, which has 4 side-mounted pistons.... I could not be happier with it. However, in a band, Festivo's typical playing position with the bell slanted to the player's left is likely to raise more than three eyebrows, not including those of the band director *Grins!* the classic Dolce vertical playing configuration would be more appropriate.


    Here is the Dolce homepage, with US pricing:

    https://wessex-tubas.com/collections...uphonium-ep100
    Regards, Guido
    Last edited by guidocorona; 01-04-2019 at 10:32 AM.
    Wessex EP104 Festivo + DC4, SM4U

  8. #8
    If you are interested in a Besson sound check out the John Packer 274. Very nice horns and can get them reasonably. Try Midsouth Music in Tennessee for the best prices. Joe Sellmansberger will treat you right.
    John 3:16

    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Snorlax View Post
    In addition to Wessex, the Mack Brass 1150 is also a fine step-up--also compensating.
    Couldn't agree more -- there are awesome compensating euphs for someone who is looking to upgrade from a 3 valve or 4 valve non-compensating baritone / euphonium. If one outgrows the likes of a Wessex or Mack Brass, then a professional quality instrument would be in order.
    James Kircoff
    Genesee Wind Symphony - principal euphonium (Adams E3 Custom .60mm yellow brass bell w/ K&G 3.5)
    Capital City Brass Band (2019 NABBA 2nd section champions) - 1st baritone (Besson BE956 w/ Denis Wick 6BY)

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Davidus1 View Post
    If you are interested in a Besson sound check out the John Packer 274. Very nice horns and can get them reasonably. Try Midsouth Music in Tennessee for the best prices. Joe Sellmansberger will treat you right.
    I 100% agree. I own a Packer and it is one of the best compensating horns out there for the money! If you do get one, get it off of Reevesbrass. Brand new, they go for about $1200. Also, be sure to try out these horns first before you buy them. I suggest going to a conference, like the Army Tuba-Euph workshop at the end of this month.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •