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Thread: Yamaha (coated) valve springs

  1. Yamaha (coated) valve springs

    Does anyone use Yamaha springs on their Adams euphonium? how do they fit? Don't like the Mead springs on my E3.

    Thanks for the info,
    Euphonium: Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium (SS Bell)
    Mouthpiece: Wedge 104E
    Trombone: Benge 175F
    Mouthpiece: AR Resonance 26

  2. #2
    I tried them. They are a little bit too light, and I like light.
    --
    Barry

  3. #3
    I had them in my "Schiller"; they have to be replaced frequently. After a couple years the plastic starts wearing off, and the little bits get caught between the valve and the wall and cause the valve to stick.
    David Bjornstad

    1923 Conn New Wonder 86I, Bach 6 1/2 AL
    2018 Wessex EP100 Dolce, Denis Wick 4ABL
    2013 Jinbao JBEP-1111L, Denis Wick 4AM
    2015 Jinbao JBBR-1240, Denis Wick clone mouthpiece of unknown designation
    Cullman (AL) Community Band (Euph Section Leader)
    Brass Band of Huntsville (2nd Bari)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,976
    I really like them. I have them in my Mack Brass euph and they work much better for me there than the Steven Mead springs did (those are now living in my little 1924 Eb tuba). But on the other hand, I don't use those two horns much. I'm what horn you put them in also matters a lot. They're not expensive. I'd try them in the Adams, see how they work for you, and watch for the coating wear. My own view about such things is that for something like this, it's worth replacing them more often than you need to replace uncoated springs since the expense is minor and the benefit is high. But that's an individual choice. And like Barry says, they may just be a bit light in the Adams.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  5. #5
    I find the Yamaha springs too light, as mentioned above. And I find the standard Mead springs too heavy, mostly the first valve spring, which is longer than the others. So I bought 2 sets and used only the 2 & 3 valve springs (I use the normal Mead spring for the 4th valve in that valve)

    But try the Mead light springs. They are a good balance for most people. Check the photo below. This is an Adams with the light springs. I loosened the valve tops and let the pistons just rest on the spring. You can see how far they stick out. Compare to your other springs. The higher they stick out, the stiffer they will feel (approximately). This is what I used for that loaner yellow brass horn I used while my own was being repaired at the factory.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  6. #6
    Is it possible for anyone to take a measurement of their Yamaha springs?

    I was told by the technician in my country that there's only 1 Yamaha spring for both compensating and non compensating horns. I've used them on my Yamaha EP100 without issue, but they feel too light on a compensating horn, especially when the length seems to be rather short compared to the factory spring on my compensating horn. So I am curious if there's actually another set of Yamaha springs for compensating horns, or they really just use the same set of short sprints for both type of horns.

    The Yammy springs are almost 80% of the price of a set of Mead springs (including delivery) , so I am honestly tempted to try out the Mead springs.

    But first, wanted to check the length of the Yammy spring and see if it is indeed the same spring as the one I have on my student model.

    Thank you!
    "Never over complicate things. Accept "bad" days. And always enjoy yourself when playing, love the sound we can make on our instruments (because that's why we all started playing the Euphonium)"

    Euphonium: JP 274 MKII
    Mouthpiece: K&G 4D, Denis Wick 5AL,Arnolds & sons 6 1/2 AL-B
    Gone but not forgotten: Yamaha EP100 (May you serve the children well in the hands of your new owner. Thank you for the past 15 years)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,155
    Just measured some old Yammy springs I still have. They’re just under 2” in length. 50mm to be exact. I think your tech is correct in that all of the available springs by Yamaha for the euph are the same. The valve of a compensating horn are longer thus heavier so you may see the valve bounce on the up stroke.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    El Cumbanchero (excerpts)
    ; Raphael Hernandez, arr. Iwai from our Swing/Salsa concert 2018
    Video of above: El Cumbanchero:

  8. #8
    Thank you, sir! Seems like they are the same! How odd. Heard how people like using Yammy springs on compensating horns but they just feel too light on mine.
    "Never over complicate things. Accept "bad" days. And always enjoy yourself when playing, love the sound we can make on our instruments (because that's why we all started playing the Euphonium)"

    Euphonium: JP 274 MKII
    Mouthpiece: K&G 4D, Denis Wick 5AL,Arnolds & sons 6 1/2 AL-B
    Gone but not forgotten: Yamaha EP100 (May you serve the children well in the hands of your new owner. Thank you for the past 15 years)

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianeSparkle View Post
    Thank you, sir! Seems like they are the same! How odd. Heard how people like using Yammy springs on compensating horns but they just feel too light on mine.
    I tried them for a while in one horn, either my Sterling or my Adams (my 2007 Sterling used the same valve set as Adams). I had to stretch them a bit for my taste. But that can be tricky to do correctly, because you have to make sure the top and bottom remain perpendicular to the length of the spring.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,976
    Maybe they work well in Yamaha horns and clones thereof, but perhaps not in at least some other designs? I have them in my Mack Brass Yamaha clone and don't think they're too light. I don't like light springs. And I don't like springs that are too heavy either. I follow the leadership fo Goldilocks on things like this and require them to be "just enough".
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

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