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Thread: After-market trigger on the XO 1270

  1. #1
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    Question After-market trigger on the XO 1270

    Please excuse me if this seems like an odd question,

    Has anyone attempted to install an after-market trigger onto the XO 1270? I am a freshman euphonium performance major and in the market to upgrade from my Yamaha YEP-321S. The XO looks very promising in terms of intonation and particularly price (not to mention my studio teacher is a sponsored artist), but personally I am a huge proprietor of triggers. Even if the horn is perfectly in equal temperament (which doesn't seem possible since the harmonic series is just intonation), I'd still love a trigger to tune with other instruments on the spot (particularly something like a CC Tuba, whose "bad notes" are next to a euph's "good ones"). The reason I ask is because something like the MTP trigger is only guaranteed to fit an MTP, Besson, Yamaha or Willson horn, so I don't know if this is even possible.

    My apologies for such a long post, but I appreciate you reading!
    Noah

  2. #2
    Welcome to the forum! I'll let others address your main question (because I have no experience with aftermarket triggers).

    Remember that a trigger only pulls a pitch down. If you are flat on certain notes or compared to certain instruments, the trigger can't help you.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
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  3. #3
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    Although I don't play an XO I was considering having a trigger added to my M5050 some years ago. I spoke with Mike Morse, brass tech at Tuba Exchange. He said it could be done but the legs of the MTS (main tuning slide) have to be perfectly parallel for it to work well. After thinking about awhile I decided against it.
    Rick Floyd
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    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
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  4. #4
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Welcome to the forum! I'll let others address your main question (because I have no experience with aftermarket triggers).

    Remember that a trigger only pulls a pitch down. If you are flat on certain notes or compared to certain instruments, the trigger can't help you.
    Thank you! I have been looking around the forum for a couple years now. Such a great resource for young players like myself.

    I know triggers are traditionally set just to lower the horn, but I have also heard of people setting it so they always have it slightly depressed and can release it to bring up the pitch (I believe Mark Kellogg of the RPO does this although I believe he's primarily a trombonist). Even so I'll have to keep that in mind, so thank you again.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by LazerN View Post
    I know triggers are traditionally set just to lower the horn, but I have also heard of people setting it so they always have it slightly depressed and can release it to bring up the pitch (I believe Mark Kellogg of the RPO does this although I believe he's primarily a trombonist). Even so I'll have to keep that in mind, so thank you again.
    I would STRONGLY advise against that practice. First, it is difficult to keep the exact main tuning you want, which could make you out of tune or cause you chops to "lip" to compensate automatically. But more important is the fact that this adds a bit extra of stress to you left hand. You could end up with a strain, or even a soft injury (speaking from experience, here).
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    I would STRONGLY advise against that practice. First, it is difficult to keep the exact main tuning you want, which could make you out of tune or cause you chops to "lip" to compensate automatically. But more important is the fact that this adds a bit extra of stress to you left hand. You could end up with a strain, or even a soft injury (speaking from experience, here).
    Okay! Very good to know as I sometimes form strain in my left hand as is. Thank you!

  7. Noah,

    As you know, I play two horns, one with trigger and one without. This is by design since I wanted the Adams optimized for light weight and ergonomics while I also wanted to keep my heavier Sterling optimized for its sound and playability. Based on my experience, I want to put a +1 to what Dave said about the approach to using the euphonium trigger to adjust pitch the way one does on trombone. Sage advice!

    Also, I am not big fan of "added on" triggers. The engineering to get it "right" is not insignificant. Changes to bracing on the 3rd valve slide and main tuning slide are generally required to provide stiffness and yet room for the trigger to operate. The linkage needs to be well engineered to allow easy tuning adjustment, positive up and down stops, and yet also permit easy tuning slide removal for cleaning. The tuning slide itself needs to be carefully aligned with the legs and everything needs to be straight and parallel, just as on your trombone. The fit between slide and legs needs to be loosened just the right amount so air seal is good, but friction is dramatically lessened using an oil or trombone cream. Finally, the need for an adequate "guard" or belly pan to keep the slide from hitting your body without causing all of the weight to be carried on your arms is often overlooked on the add-ons.

    Mr. Ruby
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  8. #8
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    I'm glad I posed this question on the forum, as I wasn't sure of the risks involved. Not even a day since I posted, and already great advice from a few people. Thank you, Mr. Ruby.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by daruby View Post
    The fit between slide and legs needs to be loosened just the right amount so air seal is good, but friction is dramatically lessened using an oil or trombone cream.
    That reminds me! Don't forget that if you change your mind later and want to remove the gadget, you have a lot of work to have done, AND your tuning slide may no longer be adjustable to fit "normally" without falling out, once the trigger is no longer holding it.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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