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Thread: King 2266 for military band

  1. King 2266 for military band

    I'm a military musician. And I play in a compensated Euphonium, but I have a lot of back pain. And I can not continue to use this Euphonium. so I bought a King 2266 Baritone.

    But, I feel uncomfortable because of the different design of the instrument.

    Change the playing posture.

    Has anyone ever played Military Band and used a King 2266 Baritone?

    Please help me with tips and how do I adapt ...

    thank you

  2. #2
    I have heard of others who switched for much the same reason. I've played this kind of horn in concert and marching. Generally, easier to hold and lighter.

    Here are some thoughts.

    Even if still uncomfortable, I bet you noticed that your left arm can be in a stronger position and support the weight. You can grab on to the big tubing if you need to. You didn't say exactly what was uncomfortable.

    Remember to adjust the position of the horn so that the leadpipe and mouthpiece angle at your face is close to what you had before. That is, don't put your neck or jaw in some odd position. Check in front of a mirror. For some, a Steward Stand works well. https://www.wwbw.com/Stewart-Euphoni...SAAEgJUWfD_BwE Also other kinds of tuba stands. I would not use a back strap. You might experiment with small firm pillows while sitting.

    For standing, try moving left hand down the main tubing so you can cradle the instrument a bit from below rather than support with with your left hand grip. The bottom bow for me gets tucked into the right side of the tummy. Different from my upright valve compensating horn.

    For the right hand, tilt the horn to your body and arm to get the valves in line with your right hand and arm. That is, don't jack your right wrist to play. Again, Look in a mirror, and with out the horn, hold your arm like you're pulling a baby close to the center of your chets. Your wrist should be in line with the forearm and fingers curved. Arm might be at a 30 to 45 degree angle up from elbow to writs. Them move the horn in and try to keep that feeling.

    Other aspects of the switch:

    You may be switching from a large or euro bore to small bore mouthpiece. If so, you might start with playing with the same cup and rim, but if you feel you're fighting the horn, find a mouthpiece that suits the instrument, yet maintains your rim size/shape. This is a smaller bore horn .560 overall compared to a Besson or Willson compensating, .590/670. I would not go hugely deep or wide to compensate for the smaller or different sound compared to a larger compensating horn.

    Does the top of the 3rd valve slide move? You may need to loosen that up so you can slide it to fine tune various combinations.

    Practice false tones in the gap range between low E and pedal Bb before you mess around with the new valve combinations. To get some control and air happening, and different feel and strength compared to compensated. For non-compensated combinations, typically.
    E 2 4
    Eb 1 4 and lip down.
    D 3 4 or 1 2 4 and lip down or 2 3 4 and lip up. This is where moving the 3rd slide can help.
    Db for me, 1 3 4. Unless you can really pull a slide for 2 3 4.
    C 1 2 3 4 and lip down.
    (B) false fingering is 2 3.

    Best. I'd get together with friends to see how they adjust the horn to their body to get some other ideas.

  3. I appreciate your tips ... I will practice. I really need to adapt the fact that the King 2266 is a small bore.
    when I need to play standing I realized that I need to support the instrument more in my left hand.

  4. "Best. I'd get together with friends to see how they adjust the horn to their body to get some other ideas."

    Unfortunately where I live there are no musicians playing with a similar instrument.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Abner Jorge View Post
    "Best. I'd get together with friends to see how they adjust the horn to their body to get some other ideas."

    Unfortunately where I live there are no musicians playing with a similar instrument.
    My most steady duet partners have been trumpet players. There is a lot of Bb treble clef lit so if you're rusty on treble, this is a good motivator. Also trombonists and their duets, tubists. Whoever. Yeah, it'd be nice to duet with a euphonium colleague for that homogenous sound, but I also get a kick out of a heterogenous sound with a good trumpet player.

    Best in your playing.

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