Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 48

Thread: Adams E3 configurations?

  1. Adams E3 configurations?

    Just browsing their website and pouring thru all the information on this board. Iím curious if anyone is playing an E3 with .7mm thickness and either the red brass or sterling silver bell?

    JJ

  2. Hi JJ,

    Unless they changed the available options red brass is not available on the E3. Sterling Silver is 0.55 or 0.60.

    I'm playing a E3 0.60 with Sterling Silver Bell and MTS trigger and (for me) this is the best euphonium I've ever played. I play it mostly in Brass Band and I've got only positive reactions on the sound.
    It plays easier for me then the Prestige, Geneva and Sterling I've previously owned thus allowing me to focus more on expression and musicallity.

    Long story short: I love my E3
    Last edited by DutchEupho; 06-04-2018 at 04:16 AM.
    Euphonium: Adams E3 Custom Series (SS Bell)
    Trombone: Benge 175F


  3. Just going off whatís listed on the website. Everyone seems to love their E3.

  4. #4
    I really don't like the sterling silver as you really need to push it to get the best results, I imagine a relatively heavy bell would exasperate that characteristic.
    --
    Barry

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    I really don't like the sterling silver as you really need to push it to get the best results, I imagine a relatively heavy bell would exasperate that characteristic.
    Interesting observation. I don't find that myself. For example, I recently performed Baadsvik's Ordner Seg again on my E3 ss .60. It starts off at a soft dynamic in a very relaxed style. From the first note I was actually surprised how full and rich it sounded at this low dynamic. My wife was in the audience and made the same observation.

    I have never tried a .70 ss bell on either E1 or E3, so I can't say if I would warm up to a .70ss. I know I like the standard yellow .70 E3, but that's not based on a long-term test. As you may have picked up from a few other comments, I don't want a sound that goes TOO dark and/or becomes tuba-like. So I might wind up not liking a .70ss, but time will tell (given the opportunity).
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  6. I am playing a yellow brass .70 E3 with brushed brass finish, no trigger. I believe the .70 thickness is only available in yellow brass on the E3. However my horn is also a top-sprung short action valve prototype, so it probably plays a bit differently than a horn with standard "Bauerfeind" valveset. Compared with other E1's and E3's I have played, the intonation is not quite as good (a product of the changes required with the valveset), but the response and tone are quite good. The horn has better ease of dynamic range than the Besson Sovereign it replaces, and save a slightly flat 2nd partial, better intonation. Ergonomics and valve action are 2nd to none. This is significant given that I am playing with a broken right hand just now.

    The caveat is that compared with my Sterling, it still comes in 2nd place in all categories except ergonomics. The Sterling has a smoother, velvety sound, response that is just as good, and equal or better intonation except 6th partial (which is handled by the trigger). Thus, all things being equal, I prefer my Sterling for every day playing, but use the Adams when I am less than my best physically.

    Doug

    PS. Note that I purchased the Adams specifically as backup horn due to my not infrequent tendonitis problems, so it fits my current need fantastically.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    I really don't like the sterling silver as you really need to push it to get the best results, I imagine a relatively heavy bell would exasperate that characteristic.
    I have to second Dave's comments as well. Coincidentally, I performed Baadsvik's Ordner Seg in a church for the Offertory late last month (May 2018). It requires a very delicate touch in much of the piece. Since it is rather slow, it requires a lot of musicality to make the notes really sing and have movement, even slowly. There are parts with a loud dynamic, but much of it is very expressive, rubato like, soft parts. My Adams E3 with SS bell (.60) performed remarkably well. I played the dynamics pretty much as written and asked my wife, Linda, who was in the audience, to let me know if she could hear all the soft parts. She said it sounded wonderful and could be heard all over the rather large sanctuary at the softest dynamic. It felt very solid and the presence of the euphonium really stood out. I could feel the resonance, even at p and double pp. A lot of the piece is in a very nice range for the euphonium, I think it only goes to high G just once, most of the rest is below F.

    By the way, this is a great piece to play as a Euphonium solo. The piano part is very nice, not your standard "blah" accompaniment you get with some solos. The euphonium and piano work very nicely together in this arrangement. It really tests your skills with a piece that is technically not hard at all, but to make music, requires all of your skills of musicianship.

    The Adams E3 euphonium is the best euphonium I have ever owned.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  8. #8
    For example, here is my recording of Ordner Seg from earlier this year:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CUNn4cpVOs

    This is slower than Oystein plays it, but it better matched what was in my mind after I heard Oystein describe the motivation for writing it. He said he woke after a long winter and saw a beautiful sunrise combined with the water and mountains in his view. It put him in a very peaceful mood. But then the worries of the day started to encroach. He finally regained his feeling of peace so he could enjoy the moment.
    Last edited by davewerden; 06-04-2018 at 07:58 PM.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  9. #9
    DutchEupho - can you expand more on ease of playing your E3 vs the Geneva you had? I'm finding just the opposite going from a Geneva Cardinal to .6 E3 - I find the E3 much harder to play. I'm actually a bit surprised by this, but it could be the fact that the horn is not truly broken in yet, despite being a demo horn.
    Yamaha Neo w/Trigger, Lacquer
    K&G 3.5D

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dumfries, VA (Potomac Shores)
    Posts
    282
    Different materials for different folks. I love my sterling silver bell E3. Barry plays with me in Brass of the Potomac... so he could speak to (hopefully) how it can really project... (hopefully) I absolutely love the colors I can get with that material on both the high and low ends of the spectrum. Can blend in the section/band very easily but can also soar when needed.
    Brandon Jones
    Euphonium, The USAF Band
    Washington, D.C.
    bmjones82@gmail.com

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •