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Thread: Flying with a Besson Hard Case

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Victoria, Australia (currently in Liverpool, UK)
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    19
    Thanks for that. I shall have to have a look for one. Much appreciated!

  2. This is from Steve Meads web site.
    Of course this is a question I often get asked about! 99% of the time I have no problem whatsoever carrying my euphonium onto the playing in a gig bag. Most airlines are happy to let me travel with the euphonium in a gig bag and one other carry on bag. This is an internationally agreed airline policy, but some airlines seem to vary a little bit in their application of this agreement. So long as the instrument can fit through the scanner you should have no problem. If your gig bag is oversized and looks too bulky you could be asked to check it it. Normal hard cases often do the job if you check in your instrument, but you always take the risk, may be as high as one in six, but your instrument will suffer damage. Heavy duty flight cases are much more likely to give long term protection but airlines are much more likely to charge you excess baggage nowadays. So a gig bag and a cheery disposition are your best tools! When travelling in a group or with the band you may find the airline less understanding. It is a problem, but with about 100 flights a year, I usually only expect problems two or three times, and then the answer is usually to check in my other carry on bag (a briefcase usually). Do not let anyone else touch your instrument!!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Victoria, Australia (currently in Liverpool, UK)
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for the information at well, Graeme. A gig bag might be out of the question at the moment (I'm a bit time poor organising this!) however it's very good knowledge for the future.

  4. #14
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    Jun 2017
    Location
    Victoria, Australia (currently in Liverpool, UK)
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    19
    Hi all, I'm back.

    There would be no issue with getting a piece of foam cut to the size of the bell would there?
    Jarrod Handley

    Besson Sovereign BE955 Baritone Horn - Denis Wick 6BS

  5. #15
    I'm not sure your question is clear. Are you talking about having it done or doing it yourself? And do you mean soft form or something like Styrofoam?
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Victoria, Australia (currently in Liverpool, UK)
    Posts
    19
    Sorry, that wasn't clear at all.

    I was thinking about getting something cut to size for inside the bell, like black packaging foam in audio equipment cases. It would stick out the top slightly to wedge against the case lining.
    Jarrod Handley

    Besson Sovereign BE955 Baritone Horn - Denis Wick 6BS

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Anorak-Horn View Post
    I was thinking about getting something cut to size for inside the bell, like black packaging foam in audio equipment cases. It would stick out the top slightly to wedge against the case lining.
    That will slightly enhance your protection. However, the drawback of soft foam is that it's...well, soft. If the horn is dropped on the bell end the dynamic weight of the horn become much greater and it will probably compress the foam and still contact the case. However, by then you have slowed it down, which is a good thing. If you cut it oversize so it is really compressed to fit in place, then TSA may not be able to put it back in correctly if they inspect.

    The preferred solution is something firm like Styrofoam (there are probably many other products I'm not aware of) that is shaped like the inside of your bell, but sticks out an additional inch or so (as much as the case will allow easily). That won't compress as much, it's very light, and it would be easy for TSA to reinsert it. The hard form spreads the impact out around the circumference of the bell throat, which is quite strong in this setting. But this type of form is tough to shape neatly! You do NOT want stray pieces left from your cutting floating around in your bell. They may find their way upstream and cause mischief.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Victoria, Australia (currently in Liverpool, UK)
    Posts
    19
    Thanks Dave. All of this has been fantastic help.
    Jarrod Handley

    Besson Sovereign BE955 Baritone Horn - Denis Wick 6BS

  9. I've flown with Besson cases many times. I use t-shirts, undies and socks to pack out the case to minimise any movement the horn can have inside the case.

    Luggage strap is recommended, as is locking the case.

  10. Also the area where I have got dents in my euph, is the nuckles of the tubing just coming out of the valves on the front of the instrument.

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