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Thread: Smaller/lighter euphonium or baritone?

  1. #11
    eBay has different options for their listings. This one has only a buy-it-now choice, which means the $1k price is what you pay, plus shipping.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  2. #12
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joan View Post
    Would the Wessex you refer to be on e-Bay, or something I would order through the company? I assume you are generalizing and not referring to a specific horn. Is that right?
    Go here to see the specific Wessex baritone (BR140): https://www.wessex-tubas.com/shop/eu...tone/baritone/

    I own a Wessex euphonium which I am very happy with. I am a pro level player. The Wessex euphonium cost me about $1100 or so a couple years ago. It is not my main horn, but one I used when in between a couple of high end horns. I have not played on the Wessex baritone, but it seems to have a great reputation from those who know or own the horn. Wessex is a good company, takes care of its customers. I don't know exactly what you heard about valves being repairable or not. In the first place, I wouldn't think the valves on a Wessex horn are necessarily going to need repair, at least in the short term. In the long term, maybe they will, but I don't see this as a problem. Wessex stands behind its instruments and should be there if needed. You hear a lot of stuff from people and dealers and sellers about Chinese instruments, don't believe everything you hear in this regard. The Chinese instruments have come a long, long way, especially a select few being sold by companies like Wessex and Mack Brass.

    So, if you want the smaller baritone horn, I think the Wessex would be an excellent choice.

    I personally would not even consider the JW Pepper when I could have the Wessex, or the King mentioned above, for not too much, relatively speaking.

    I think the King would suit you better than the Yamaha 642 if you go that route.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  3. #13
    The Wessex baritone is a fine choice if you are not going to play in a concert band and like the smaller, brighter sound of the baritone. But it is not what I would recommend for a concert band setting.

    Here is a solo I did on baritone horn:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiWHCK436gU

    And here is the same solo in the same room on euphonium:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDEofUXQxrU

    In this case the baritone actually works well on a piece that was originally for trumpet. But you can hear the tonal differences. The baritone would not very well with a band's euphonium section. However, it can be a dandy choice for a church brass group or something like that.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. #14
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    What Dave says about euphonium being a better choice for concert band, I agree. I only mentioned the baritone as that was what you were considering with the old JW Pepper horn.

    Everyone else: Mark those two YouTube videos Dave refers to above. An EXCELLENT way to hear the baritone and euphonium on the same piece in the same setting. I also heard Dave play the same piece on double belled euphonium. Great way to compare. There should be a perpetual link to these for anyone wanting to hear the difference in the baritone, euphonium and double belled euphonium.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  5. #15
    a "baritone" from a 19th century american manufacturer IS a euphonium, and not a baritone in the current usage of the word.

    I am in complete agreement that you want a euphonium, and not an antique. Baritone is a much more difficult instrument and doesn't fit into any ensembles unless you play with a british-style brass band. And modern instruments are much easier to play and tune so much better.
    --
    Barry

  6. #16
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    Order placed

    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    The Wessex baritone is a fine choice if you are not going to play in a concert band and like the smaller, brighter sound of the baritone. But it is not what I would recommend for a concert band setting.
    Well, I placed an order for the King 2268 Euphonium. I'll see how it works out. I guess I could put it back up for sale on e-Bay if it turns out to be too big for me. Then I would probably order the Wessex Baritone specified by John. Thank you both for your very thoughtful replies and information provided. I can't wait to see how this works out!

  7. #17
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    And thank you, Barry, as well. I just saw your message, and it is reassuring. Thanks!

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Joan View Post
    Well, I placed an order for the King 2268 Euphonium. I'll see how it works out. I guess I could put it back up for sale on e-Bay if it turns out to be too big for me. Then I would probably order the Wessex Baritone specified by John. Thank you both for your very thoughtful replies and information provided. I can't wait to see how this works out!
    Fun!! Please keep us posted on your impressions as you get it and work with it for a while.

    Most people use their left hand to grip the outer tube somewhere that is comfortable. I also used a grip near the bell and mouth-pipe ("leadpipe"), which helped me control it better when marching. Sometimes it seemed natural to do this while sitting, too, but that unconventional grip may not work for small hands (I never noticed anyone else using it).

    You are going to need a mouthpiece that is comfortable for you. I think I was using a Bach 7 or 9 in high school, but by today's standard of tone that was too small. In the Bach line and some others, a larger number means a smaller cup diameter (inside diameter). Smaller makes for easier high notes and brighter tone; larger makes for easier low notes and better tone. A pretty common mouthpiece for someone who is learning the horn is the Bach 6-1/2AL. That can be 50-75 dollars new, but Kelly makes some very nice copies of the popular sizes in Lexan:
    http://kellymouthpieces.com/kmtrombonesmall/index.asp

    AND you can get colors!!

    The 51D you see on that same page is also very good, but maybe not quite as good for a learner. It might be a next-step choice when you get some strength in your chops. That's a copy of a Schilke mouthpiece, which uses a different number system. The 51D is a teeny bit wider in diameter but considerably deeper.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Anderson, Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joan View Post
    Since I'm short (5 ft.), I'm looking for something on the smaller end of the size range.
    If you are looking for inspiration from a "short" euphonium player, you can't go wrong with Misa Mead. I don't exactly know how tall she is, but she is certainly petit. However, she plays like a giant.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyG4TzrsvGg
    Good luck with your new instrument.

  10. #20
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    Jun 2017
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    Update on the used King 2268

    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Fun!! Please keep us posted on your impressions as you get it and work with it for a while.
    Dave and Others,

    I wasn't able to get the King 2268 after all. Thirty minutes after I ordered it, received Confirmation, and PayPal PAID for it -- the seller cancelled on me (I didn't meet her requirements)! Only I wasn't aware of this until later that night (last Monday) because as soon as I saw the confirmation and payment, I turned off my computer and went on my way for the day, as I had other things to do. It came as a shock to me that a seller could do this on e-Bay. Guess she wanted to sell it to a young student. It didn't seem right to me, though.

    Anyway, I have some serious family responsibilities I have to deal with and so I'm postponing this decision for the time being. Will be back in touch later.

    Again, thanks for all the advice and ideas that you provided me with! The forum is a great thing you are doing.

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