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Thread: Advice on my Dynasty m845 convertible tuba

  1. Advice on my Dynasty m845 convertible tuba

    Not having much money, I have been playing a dynasty M845 convertible 3/4 tuba that I was able to get at a reasonable price. I like the horn. It's a good size for me. Others who have played it have told me that it's very responsive and I agree. I have played it in both community bands and ensembles. It is not a loud horn and our community band is large so I can get lost in the mix. I Have heard others play my horn and realize it does not have the tone and volume of a full size horn. I realize that this and the other issues of 3 valve 3/4 horns like low register playing etc...
    I have had several good/pro musicians tell me that I get a nice tone out of the horn.
    When I asked them about whether it would be a good idea to upgrade my horn, they have told me that I sound good on this horn and they do not see a reason for me to upgrade.

    My question is whether anyone here has had an experience with this horn and whether I should take the advice I've been given about not needing to upgrade.
    Last edited by Jbean88; 02-12-2017 at 08:48 AM. Reason: Grammar

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Jbean88 View Post
    I have had several good/pro musicians tell me that I get a nice tone out of the horn.
    When I asked them about whether it would be a good idea to upgrade my horn, they have told me that I sound good on this horn and they do not see a reason for me to upgrade.
    It sounds like you have been given good advise. I have owned two tubas myself. I did not own or play the model you have. However, there is nothing wrong with upgrading if you have the means. I still miss my Miraphone 186 and my Conn 20J. If you are going to upgrade then keep an eye out for a good used tuba and play it first, if possible. There is a tuba forum called Tubenet - http://forums.chisham.com/ where you can get more advise.
    Rodgeman
    Mirafone 186 Recording Bell BBb

  3. I'd talk to the conductors of the larger groups you play with and see if they agree that you disappear into the ensemble too easily. If not, then I'd stick with the good thing you've got going now.

    Even then, you may just want to stick with your 3/4 for reasons of economics and practicality. The 3/4 might be the best compromise for all the groups you're in, since a larger tuba could easily overpower a small ensemble. If you bring your instrument with you to rehearsals and gigs, hauling around something like a Conn 20J will get really tiresome really quickly, too.
    Last edited by jimpjorps; 02-12-2017 at 10:09 AM.

  4. #4
    It's good advice to talk your ensemble director(s). Or you may get some trusted ears in the audience area to comment.

    I a similar quandary when I played Besson. The 967 was great for playing with the CG Band, either within or out front. But it lacked focus for recital playing and small groups. The 968 was better in that context, but did not do as well in the larger setting.

    If large ensembles are a regular event for you, then you need to make sure your good sound goes beyond the back row of the band all the way to the back row of the audience.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  5. Ok. Ty. You all have answered my questions. The conductor of the larger community band I play in agrees that my sound does get lost when the band plays ff or louder. I will consider all this and of course, do appreciate your input.

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