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Thread: Mouthpiece characteristics for a british baritone

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by daruby View Post
    I have been playing British Baritone for a number of years now. I tried a LOT of different mouthpieces and have found my two favorites are either a Bach 5G or a Wick 6BS (NOT the SM6B). If find the these two to be VERY similar, allowing a nice deep baritone tone, yet providing enough back pressure and shallow enough cup to make the high range very accessible and pitch pretty near spot on. I find the Wick SM6B to be too deep and sharp for my taste, though the rim diameter is fine.
    Absolutely agree. I have both a 5G and a 6BS. 5G is what I have come to use as my main mouthpiece and I have a 6BS Heritage incase I have a very upper register demanding part (which you can get when playing 1st Baritone in a brass band). I have never given the SM series a go, but from what I have heard, the general concensous is that they are too deep.
    Yamaha 642-II Neo Euphonium (2016) - Denis Wick SM4
    Besson 956 Sovereign Baritone - Vincent Bach 5G

  2. Here is how Steven Mead describes the SM6BU of the "Ultra" series of baritone mouthpieces on his web store:
    "We thought long and hard about this mouthpiece. The classic baritone mouthpiece over the years has been the 6BS, and the SMB6 (U) takes this mouthpiece one step further. Although it will initially feel the same on the lips, it is a high performance mouthpiece that is already receiving rave reviews from the leading baritone soloists in the country.
    Although the inspiration for this was the 6BS we've modified the cup depth a little making it just slightly deeper, giving what many traditionalists feel is the perfect baritone sound. But its ease of playing and rich vibrant sound is sure to make a big impression.
    The high range is quite astonishing and will allow for hours of full playing with increased stamina."

  3. Quote Originally Posted by iiipopes View Post
    Although the inspiration for this was the 6BS we've modified the cup depth a little making it just slightly deeper, giving what many traditionalists feel is the perfect baritone sound. But its ease of playing and rich vibrant sound is sure to make a big impression.
    The high range is quite astonishing and will allow for hours of full playing with increased stamina."
    This is exactly what I do not want. I don't want deeper than the 6BS. I can get a very deep, rich, sound with the 6BS or the Bach 5G. Anything bigger (even the SM6B (non-U)), does not respond well for me and I do not have as good stamina when playing it. Plus, I like the "soft" rim of the 6BS compared with the typical Steven Mead mouthpiece (older SM or SM(U) or SM(X)).
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone & Conn 24I/25I euphonium
    New England Brass Band/Metropolitan Wind Symphony
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  4. #14
    The SM6BU is quite a bit deeper than the 6BS. I don't know of any "leading baritone soloists" who use the SM-series mouthpieces. The proper approach to the baritone gives you a rich, vibrant sound without having to have the negative effects that come from a deeper mouthpiece.
    --
    Barry

  5. Ah, yes. It is interesting to see what the "real world" players say as opposed to the marketing blurbs. - Just don't shoot the messenger!

  6. #16
    I am in counter-tendency about what is told here.I am not a baritone player, I play it only when I have a marching service with the band,and I don't like the baritone sound with a shallow mouthpiece:I prefer a deep cup with a large diameter and I use a special customed mouthpiece by K&G, size 3C little shank, built for me by Dennis " Kurun" Camilleri.With this mouthpiece I prefer the sound,the high register is easy and the endurance is improved.When I began to play brass instruments in the 60th, the baritone (flicorno tenore) was a permanent member of every wind band,then, going on with the years,it disappeared, replaced by euphonium, (bombardino) that has a mellowness voice, whereas the flicorno tenore makes a sharp sound that is not very appreciated by band directors.
    Besson Prestige 2052,3D K&G mouthpiece;JP373 baritone,T4C K&G mouthpiece;Bach 42GO trombone,T4C K&G mouthpiece

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Sturgis, South Dakota
    Posts
    935
    Franz: Thanks for the different view. I jumped in here just because my wife's mother is from Italy (married my wife's dad, a soldier, after WWII). So I like most things Italian.

    I really like the Italian name for euphonium - Bombardino. Now if that name doesn't sound like a mellow instrument, what does???
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  8. I recently purchased a baritone SM6 Ultra from Matt @ Dillon Music. It came last week. I'm still sorting it out, but I like its response. To me, it feels like essentially a deeper 6 1/2 AL, with a hair larger throat and backbore, but a similar geometry transition of a slightly rounded bottom of the cup to the throat.

    Compared to the King System Blue baritone mouthpiece, with its very funnel cup, and a dark timbre, for me, the timbre of the SM6 Ultra can be described as mellow but present, with more fundamental than a 6 1/2 AL. For what I play, I think I'm going to like it. I can see where those baritone players who have a little brighter tone concept may not like it. I'll keep both the SBBA and the SM6 Ultra in my case, as there will be times when the different timbres may suit one piece more than another.
    Last edited by iiipopes; 02-13-2017 at 09:56 AM.

  9. #19
    It's not so much a matter of tone concept. I think we all agree that a nice dark tone is ideal. It's a matter of approach to the instrument. Embouchure, airflow -- that sort of thing. Euphonium players tend to play baritone as if it were a euphonium. In this sense, the deeper mouthpieces help you get the right sound, but with a cost that some of the lightness and projection in a more horn-like sense tend to get lost. I think the SM-series and Alliance mouthpieces are really ideal for euphonium players doubling on baritone. If you play the baritone like a baritone you can get the dark sound without the deep cup.
    --
    Barry

  10. Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    It's not so much a matter of tone concept. I think we all agree that a nice dark tone is ideal. It's a matter of approach to the instrument. Embouchure, airflow -- that sort of thing. Euphonium players tend to play baritone as if it were a euphonium. In this sense, the deeper mouthpieces help you get the right sound, but with a cost that some of the lightness and projection in a more horn-like sense tend to get lost. I think the SM-series and Alliance mouthpieces are really ideal for euphonium players doubling on baritone. If you play the baritone like a baritone you can get the dark sound without the deep cup.
    Barry,ya took the words right out of my mouth.....+1
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone & Conn 24I/25I euphonium
    New England Brass Band/Metropolitan Wind Symphony
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

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