Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: New Tornister Euphonium!

  1. New Tornister Euphonium!

    Here is Wessex latest baby!

    It is a travel euphonium based on 19th century tornister design used by the Austro-Hungarian army updated for the modern world - so is the tenor tuba equivalent of our Mighty Midget. It is a real beauty and has to be seen to appreciate how small it is. We have called it the 'Maly' which means in Czech small and cute. It plays well with singing tone and good intonation and comes in small case which can easily be taken on flight as cabin luggage. We hope the first will be available in the summer.









    Those attending NAMM, or US Army Tuba/Euphonium conference can see and try for themselves.
    www.Wessex-Tubas.com
    Customer Services & Chicago Showroom visits: Dolce@Wessex-Tubas.com
    Shipping & UK Showroom visits: Coda@Wessex-Tubas.com

    Visit our Facebook page

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    NYC metro area
    Posts
    454
    Cute, all right! How much does it weigh?
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1 (DE 101XTG9 mouthpiece in the drawer)
    Bach 36B trombone; Bach 6.5AL mouthpiece (pBone on loan to granddaughter)
    Steinway 1902 Model A, restored by AC Pianocraft in 1988; Kawai MP8, Yamaha KX-76
    See my avatar: Jazz (the black cockapoo) and Delilah (the cavapoo) keep me company while practicing

  3. #3
    It's darned cute, alright!

    Could we also see a photo of the case? I'd be curious how pack-able it is.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,071
    While the intended market for these (and the tornister tubas) seems to be people who "travel" (for one reason or another?), I wonder if there isn't a market for these sorts of things in the population of aging community band low brass players who have difficulty with "normally sized" instruments. I know several people who have changed instruments to smaller ones because they no longer feel able to carry/transport the instruments they've played for most of their lives.

    Of course, this depends very strongly on the weight of the "downscaled" versions. And the only tornister tuba I've heard close up (rehearsing in a fairly small tuba/euphonium group a few years ago) was not something I'd want to use in a community band. Still it would seem to be a possibility, at least if you weren't the sole tuba in the band.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba (with std US receiver), Kellyberg
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Summerfield, Florida
    Posts
    1,590
    Oh-oh!! Shouldn't have shown me this!! We got trouble! Right here in River City! (from the Music Man). This is way too neat.

    Jonathan - how much for this little jewel??
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band, Ocala, FL (Euphonium)

  6. I can take photo of case and weigh when next in store. But I can say it is not heavy. Noticeably lighter than full size euphonium. For price, although small there is a lot of work making including new bell mandrel. I expect price between $1,500 and $2,000.

    I agree with Gary that these are ideal for aging community band players. We have sold a number of Mighty Midget for this purpose. Their sound is very dependant on the person behind mouthpiece. With good buzz, the tornister can make nice tone, but they may not hide players shortcomings as much as full size tuba. I had good player visit Wessex UK from Italy a couple weeks ago, and really from elsewhere in building I could not tell if he was playing full size tuba or tornister - he sounded so good on either. Remember these were made for army bands, so will work well in that setting. I have played tornister as only tuba in 20 piece band and it did work providing bass. The secret is not to overblow to make sound break up. I would now love to hear tuba quartet playing tenor and bass tornister. That would be a really mobile group - could fly anywhere for gigs, no problem.

  7. #7
    I own an Eb/F Tuba of this related travel design. It is small and easy to transport. Jonathan is right, you don't want to over-blow these horns, they tend to go flat and the sound breaks up. There is more resistance as compared to a normal size horn. I primarily use mine for practice. It forces me to really listen to the tone and work on clarity. With the extra resistance, it builds up lung strength (kind of like running with weights on your legs). I have used it for practice with one of my quintets. I like to take it to practice when the weather is bad because it is much easier to transport.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,071
    I think the main problem with the one tornister tuba I experienced was not overblowing, but rather lack of breath support -- another problem (as I can testify) with the aging player. I would expect the euphonium to be easier to play well in this regard. While the price is high in relation to standard euphoniums (even of the same quality), that's not unexpected given some additional complexity of construction and a more limited market.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba (with std US receiver), Kellyberg
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  9. Here are some dimensions for you;

    Tornister Euphonium 5.9lb (compared to Dolce being 9.7 lb)
    In case 11.1 lb

    16.5" high
    7.5" bell

    Case is 19' x 14.5' x 11"

    Picture in case, although production ones will have Burgundy lining

    www.Wessex-Tubas.com
    Customer Services & Chicago Showroom visits: Dolce@Wessex-Tubas.com
    Shipping & UK Showroom visits: Coda@Wessex-Tubas.com

    Visit our Facebook page

  10. Valve bore?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •