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Thread: Practicing when after a dentist visit that involves local anesthesia

  1. #1

    Practicing when after a dentist visit that involves local anesthesia

    Dentist used shots to numb a quadrant of my mouth. I'm curious if there's any wisdom on if it's OK to practice euphonium while one quadrant is still numb or partially numb.

  2. #2
    I doubt that an attempt to play with partially numb chops would be very successful. Give it a day.
    David Bjornstad

    1923 Conn New Wonder 86I, Bach 6 1/2 AL
    2018 Wessex EP100 Dolce, Denis Wick 4ABL
    2013 Jinbao JBEP-1111L, Denis Wick 4AM
    2015 Jinbao JBBR-1240, Denis Wick clone mouthpiece of unknown designation
    Cullman (AL) Community Band (Euph Section Leader)
    Brass Band of Huntsville (2nd Bari)

  3. #3
    Give it a rest for a day or two.
    Yamaha 642-II Neo Euphonium (2016) - Denis Wick SM4
    Besson 956 Sovereign Baritone - Vincent Bach 5G

  4. You're more likely to hurt yourself accidentally in a dozen different ways than get any productive practice in.

  5. #5
    Try substituting listening to some relevant music or performers. I always find that it is time well spent.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by carbogast View Post
    Try substituting listening to some relevant music or performers. I always find that it is time well spent.
    Excellent advice! BUT ALSO... listen to some music that is just enjoyable. Don't constrain it always to "relevant" choices, but just listen to some fine music that is well performed. You need to keep your soul fed with good music from various sources. For example, this is one of my go-to recordings when I need a lift, because the music is so beautiful and well played:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3-ipr6_IFY

    I might categorize this as "relevant" because it is a soloist, and I can relate to some of the phrasing (if not the violin technique), but I suspect not many brass players reach for a violin recording very often.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  7. #7
    I buzzed into my mouthpiece while still numb... "hard"/"stiff" feeling in that numb quadrant. I passed on practice that night.

    Concerning sitting out a day or 2... is that a "rule of thumb"? Situation is, I have a morning appointment, but evening rehearsal (yeah, we didn't think ahead when scheduling a follow up appointment). Would 8 to 9 hours between the two may still be pushing it?

  8. #8
    When I was a kid, it seemed like novocaine took all day to wear off after a visit to the dentist. Nowadays, they have either figured out how to dose it better, or I burn through it quicker, but I would say that within 2-3 hours I feel good to go. YMMV, and I think the general advice to lay off until all the numbness is gone is good. I would say that if you're still experiencing any numbness after 24 hours, a call to the dentist is warranted.

  9. #9
    It seems to help me to use my mouth a lot, starting about an hour after the procedure. So smile, frown, stretch your mouth outwards and compress it inwards, talk, etc. The movement encourages more blood flow, and that helps flush the system sooner. Or at least that seems to be the case for me.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  10. #10
    So swapping out a temp crown for the permanent one got pushed back. On that day, it was only a deep cleaning, which was only one shot of the stuff, so there was plenty of time to recover.

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