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Thread: My Bog Cardboard Box is Here

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    721
    I hope that 'bog' box didn't smell too much...LOL

    DDG
    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1917 Conn C/D/Eb mellophone original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original

  2. #12
    Unfortunately, it did :-( I sent the Adams E3 back to the seller today. Worked and wrestled with the tuning slides for 3 days - they just won't, well, slide. It takes two hands and up to 3 minutes to get slides out, empty, and manage to get them back in. Can't do that during an 8-bar rest. The seller told me 'It's real easy to fix, take it to a brass tech you trust and have it fixed'. No, the words 'I will fix it for you' were not included. All of the tuning slides were stuck and dry when I got the horn. Most still are. Managed to get the three valve slides and main tuning slide to at least move. Very disappointed and disillusioned. I expected more - probably shouldn't have, but I did.

  3. #13
    That's discouraging. I think if I ever have the wherewithal to buy an upscale horn, I think that I will pick it up at the dealer's and not actually take it home with me until I'm happy with it. I hope for his sake that your seller realized the error of his way, fixes the problem, and sends the horn back. You have taken the high road in not naming the seller; hopefully things won't reach a point where [s]he no longer deserves that courtesy.
    David Bjornstad

    1923 Conn New Wonder 86I, Bach 6 1/2 AL
    2018 Wessex EP100 Dolce, Denis Wick 4ABL
    2013 Jinbao JBEP-1111L, Denis Wick 4AM
    2015 Jinbao JBBR-1240, Denis Wick clone mouthpiece of unknown designation
    Cullman (AL) Community Band (Euph Section Leader)
    Brass Band of Huntsville (2nd Bari)

  4. #14
    It's possible the seller is not great at communicating. The norm would be for you to get it fixed locally as a convenience, really (no packing/shipping/possible damage) and a time saver, and then the seller would reimburse you.

    You don't mention if you tried to clean and lube the slides yourself. It is not unusual to get a horn where the grease is dried up. Even if the dealer greased it before shipment (not all do, of course), imagine the horn sitting in a metal truck for a couple days in weather like we have here now (90+ degrees). When I rehearse for and record those videos I do, my horn has to go to work with me in the morning and sit in the car all day. My van is a very effective greenhouse and I've gotten to church sometimes with the horn in rather wacky condition, needing to be oiled before I can do anything, and often with dried-up slide grease... after 8 hours.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  5. #15
    Yes, I tried to clean and lube the slides, several times, at least those I could actually get out of the horn. Didn't seem to make much, if any, difference. After four, I just gave up. I've never seen slides that tight. When I received my new Besson 2056, the slides were not real smooth and slippery, but they certainly worked. Had to get some black gunk off them, but they were fine - and after a few weeks, they were great. The dealer said that the problem with the Adams' slides is easy to fix, the sides need to be lapped and aligned. OK, I can accept that, but if it is that easy to fix, why wasn't it done on that expensive horn BEFORE it was shipped? No axe to grind here, I'm just unwilling to pay the price for a top-of-the-line anything and then have to take it to a repair shop when I receive it before I can use it. Sure, he offered to fix the horn in his shop - $130+ each way, I pay shipping. That's just unacceptable to me. Tuning slide problems today, who knows what tomorrow? Don't need any headaches, just need a beautiful new euphonium that I can fall in love with. This one was not it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY capital district
    Posts
    13
    You stated "Don't need any headaches, just need a beautiful new euphonium that I can fall in love with. This one was not it.". I know how you feel! I received my E1 a little over a week ago. An issue developed within a few days with the 3rd valve cap. I am fortunate to live 3 hours from Austin Custom Brass and they made repair person available and I drove it over for repair. Even though it was repairable, I decided to step away from it and get a clean start with another E1 they had in stock. They were gracious to permit the upgrade and I took home a unit that has no problems. This is the beautiful new euphonium that I can fall in love with!
    John Elliott
    Adams E1, .60 mm, sterling silver bell, brushed lacquer
    Mouthpiece--Griego 5, Denis Wick SM4U, Denis Wick 4AL

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by jelliott View Post
    An issue developed within a few days with the 3rd valve cap.
    What was the issue?
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,039
    This seems very puzzling. I thought that Adams were regarded as high-end instruments. I've got a couple of low-end Chinese instruments that haven't presented such problems (and not even tempted me to send them back).

    Of course, finger-pointing is readily available. You didn't get the instrument directly from a dealer. Still, a simple cleaning and re-lubing should have solved the problem -- unless all of the slides were somehow abused by the seller.

    On the other hand, it is unfortunately true that a lot of people NEVER move their tuning slides.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY capital district
    Posts
    13
    I don't know the history of the first E1. It was on display at Austin Custom Brass. I tried several out and chose it. It was shipped to me that day to avoid sales tax. The threads of the cap were binding the first time I oiled the valve but I had no problem with the cap. After 4 days it became tricky getting the threads lined up prior to screwing down. The 5 day I couldn't screw the cap on without quickly reaching a point of resistance that I didn't want to go past for fear of cross threading it. It drove to Boston with the valve not screwed down. I hope I have been clear enough!

    The technician straightened out the threads but I did not check out the results of his work. Trent had already agreed to allow me to return the horn and I took possession of the other E1. We checked out all the slides, caps, and valves on site.
    John Elliott
    Adams E1, .60 mm, sterling silver bell, brushed lacquer
    Mouthpiece--Griego 5, Denis Wick SM4U, Denis Wick 4AL

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ghmerrill View Post
    This seems very puzzling. I thought that Adams were regarded as high-end instruments. I've got a couple of low-end Chinese instruments that haven't presented such problems (and not even tempted me to send them back).

    Of course, finger-pointing is readily available. You didn't get the instrument directly from a dealer. Still, a simple cleaning and re-lubing should have solved the problem -- unless all of the slides were somehow abused by the seller.

    On the other hand, it is unfortunately true that a lot of people NEVER move their tuning slides.
    I think both of these people (Not2Old2Play and John Elliott) bought their Adams horns new from a dealer (if I am reading their posts correctly). Not knowing what the issue with the 3rd valve cap on John's is, I can't speak much about that. Cross-threading issue? However, on the horn Not2Old2Play bought, it should have ABSOLUTELY been checked by the dealer prior to sale (both horns should). When I got my horn in May (a 5-6 month wait on the custom build), it was shipped to my dealer in South Dakota (Taylor Music - great dealer and store). The folks there (including the owner) insisted on looking my horn over from top to bottom (even though I had fully paid for it 2 months before it arrived and really did not want anyone's fingers on my new horn except my own). They checked every slide, the valves, the fit and finish, the trigger, basically everything. Again, I am real reluctant to have anyone mess with my horn for the simple reason that I believe no one on the planet will be as careful with it as I am, but I do appreciate Taylor's concern for me and their desire and determination to make sure the new horn was in perfect condition (which it was) and further, that it did not suffer any shipping damage. And they used gloves, imagine that!!

    I would think most, if not all, people who have bought an Adams euphonium (or other high-end horn) move their slides from time to time. Set at the factory usually doesn't work all the time.

    In spite of a couple of cases where people seem to not have had a good experience with an Adams horn, I continue to believe they are overall superlative instruments. Dealers need to make sure they do their part in examining thoroughly any new high-end horn they sell. It is clearly unacceptable for a dealer to acquire top end horns from manufacturers, then ship them out to long distance customers without a top to bottom examination of the entire horn. Customers should expect to receive a horn in 100% good condition before the first note is blown.
    Last edited by John Morgan; 08-11-2016 at 07:53 PM.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

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