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Thread: My Bog Cardboard Box is Here

  1. #21
    We don't always realize how much difference a dealer can make. I agree that horns should be checked before sending to customers, but it appears that did not happen in a couple cases.

    Any horn used at a trade show, or even demoed for a number of customers in the store, could end up with cross-threaded valve caps. That may be what happened above. I've also found that sometimes there is just some crud in the threads. The loaner Adams I used last year while my current horn was being built had just come from TMEA. One valve cap was very fussy, but I just put a little oil on a cloth and "followed" the threads (rubbed them hard, in this case). That seemed to clean off something that was in there, because the cap was fine after that.

    In my adult life I have only owned horns made by Besson, Sterling, and Adams. I also helped to test a batch of 6 Hirsbrunners once to give them a grade. Of those 4 brands, direct from the factory, there were some clean-up issues that needed attention. Not on all individual horns, but on at least a couple from each brand.

    Then we have brands like Yamaha, which does a better job at that final prep stage. But as I learned at ITEC this year, they are shipped with pads that are too thick, anticipating they will flatten over time. But your brand-new horn will not play quite the way it should.

    Anyway, it pays to be a little handy with some of the basic clean-up tasks - you'll need them after you use the horn for a while anyway!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY capital district
    Posts
    13
    Perhaps I made a mountain out of a mole hill regarding the threads of the valve cap. I have played only 2 horns in the 33 years I have played the euphonium and the caps lined up perfectly. I did not feel confident to twist past the point of resistance. And simply made up my mind I did not want to have a touchy valve cap in my last horn. The horn had been a demo and was sold as such. The problem may have been caused by a tester looking at the valve. I don't know. I do know the problem was benign when it shipped and successive oiling made it worse.
    John Elliott
    Adams E1, .60 mm, sterling silver bell, brushed lacquer
    Mouthpiece--Griego 5, Denis Wick SM4U, Denis Wick 4AL

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,261
    When I bought my M5050 from Tube Exchange it too was a display model. The 3rd valve cap was a bit fussy in that it wanted to cross thread at times if I wasn't careful. I spoke with the repair tech at TE (Mike) who suggested I take it to a reputable instrument repair shop and have them "chase the threads". By chasing he meant take the same size thread tap (or die) and run it down. This fixed the problem. I think that someone in the showroom trying out the horn must have been a little careless and started to cross thread it. I mentioned to Mike that I really preferred the faster threads that Yamaha horns employ because they seem easier to start and less likely to cross thread. Mike told me that since they're faster threads (less turns to completely tighten) means the threads have to be cut deeper. This makes the casing thinner in that area so the casing can become out-or-round after awhile. He said he's seen some Yamaha horns come in the shop with that problem.

    Sorry you had that problem John.
    Last edited by RickF; 08-12-2016 at 09:06 AM.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    El Cumbanchero (Rafael Hernández) cell phone video

  4. #24
    FWIW the fix was fairly quick and easy on John's trial Adams but in the end he decided to upgrade to a sterling-belled e1 which I think he's happy with. I'm sorry this issue came up and made sure to make it right with the price on the Sterling model.

    Regards,
    Trent
    Trent Austin
    Owner
    Austin Custom Brass
    www.austincustombrass.com
    austincustombrass.mybigcommerce.com

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,261
    Thanks for the update Trent.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    El Cumbanchero (Rafael Hernández) cell phone video

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY capital district
    Posts
    13
    Thank you for your support, Trent! I am truly enjoying the E1!
    John Elliott
    Adams E1, .60 mm, sterling silver bell, brushed lacquer
    Mouthpiece--Griego 5, Denis Wick SM4U, Denis Wick 4AL

  7. #27
    Hey!! Include me in on this!! After I returned the defective E3 I went looking for its replacement. I found it at Austin Custom Brass in the form of an Adams E1, sterling, .60, with a main tuning slide trigger. Ian at ACB did a marvelous job of preparing the horn - everything worked!! Couldn't be more pleased with the customer service and attention to detail of Trent and the gang at ACB. Trent offered me a fair price, did what he did he would do and followed up when he got back from vacation. What more can a customer ask for?

    Do need a bit of information, I'm sure someone here has the answer. This is my first horn with a tuning slide trigger and am not real sure about the care and feeding of the animal. I does seem to me that tuning slide grease is a bit too heavy for the slide. I have purchased some trombone slide cream and plan on cleaning the tuning slide tomorrow and trying the cream. Am I on the right track here? Will the trombone slide cream need to be replenished more often than the standard slide grease? Should I be using a synthetic slide grease on everything including the main slide? Do I have any idea what I'm talking about?

    Quite happy with the E1. It's beautiful, sounds great (even for me) and I'm looking forward to MANY hours with it in my arms. Not sure about the 2" double threaded tuning slide adjustment nut (sorry, don't know how else to describe it). Sure seems wobbly, like the threaded ends of the trigger linkage are too small for the long nut thingy. Anybody else run into this?

  8. #28
    Oh, and if anyone was wondering, NO Trent did NOT sell me the defective E3 - it was another dealer many, many miles from ACB. Trent couldn't have been better to work with - top-notch service!

  9. #29
    Thanks for sharing the rest of the experience.

    When I had a Sterling Virtuoso with trigger, I used trombone slide cream (at the suggestion of Sterling). You DO need to replenish frequently. For me I would add a little every few days, and then clean and re-lube every month.

    To do the "add" routine, push the trigger out as far as it will go. Then add slide cream on the part of the inner slide you just exposed. Work the slide a few times and clean off the excess. Takes a minute or two.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Not2Old2Play View Post
    Hey!! Include me in on this!! After I returned the defective E3 I went looking for its replacement. I found it at Austin Custom Brass in the form of an Adams E1, sterling, .60, with a main tuning slide trigger. Ian at ACB did a marvelous job of preparing the horn - everything worked!! Couldn't be more pleased with the customer service and attention to detail of Trent and the gang at ACB. Trent offered me a fair price, did what he did he would do and followed up when he got back from vacation. What more can a customer ask for?

    Do need a bit of information, I'm sure someone here has the answer. This is my first horn with a tuning slide trigger and am not real sure about the care and feeding of the animal. I does seem to me that tuning slide grease is a bit too heavy for the slide. I have purchased some trombone slide cream and plan on cleaning the tuning slide tomorrow and trying the cream. Am I on the right track here? Will the trombone slide cream need to be replenished more often than the standard slide grease? Should I be using a synthetic slide grease on everything including the main slide? Do I have any idea what I'm talking about?

    Quite happy with the E1. It's beautiful, sounds great (even for me) and I'm looking forward to MANY hours with it in my arms. Not sure about the 2" double threaded tuning slide adjustment nut (sorry, don't know how else to describe it). Sure seems wobbly, like the threaded ends of the trigger linkage are too small for the long nut thingy. Anybody else run into this?
    Not2Old2Play - Happy to see that you have found an Adams! They are remarkable horns and Trent and ACB have very good reputations for service and customer care.

    As for the tuning trigger and slide, I agree with Dave's recommendation about trombone slide cream. I have also used just regular tuning slide grease and get okay results (it is not as slick and easy to move in and out as trombone slide cream is, but works okay for me). I don't fuss with it too much because I tend to use it little. I am used to lipping notes, and the Adams plays so darn well in tune, I sometimes forget I have it. I will probably get used to using it a bit more, but not much. My adjustment "nut" will get a bit wobbly when it is almost ready to come off of the screws on each end when I am undoing it, but I only have the tuning slide out about 1/2 to 2/3 of an inch, so it is not really wobbly at that setting. If yours is wobbly at that setting, you might need someone to take a look at it. Make sure your little set screws are tightened. By the way, you use the long screw, where the thumb lever (trigger) to activate the main tuning slide rests, to adjust how far out the lever will sit when not engaged (in case you did not know).

    I use Bach/Selmer tuning slide grease and it comes in plastic bottles where you can squeeze the bottle to put it on (without having to use your finger to get grease out of other styles of containers). I like it, it is on the heavy duty side, and lasts long.

    Live long and prosper with that great new horn of yours!! Adams are absolutely wonderful euphoniums, and I am so delighted you have one. And never too old to play!!!!!
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

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