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Thread: Custom Adams E3 for Brass Band use

  1. Custom Adams E3 for Brass Band use

    Hi All,

    If someone would have a E3 custom made for (UK) Brass Band use only. What would the preferred setup be?

    0.7 0.8 ?
    Sterling silver bell?

    intrested in what your opinions are.....
    Last edited by DutchEupho; 09-19-2016 at 08:35 AM.
    Euphonium: Adams E3 Custom Series (SS Bell)
    Trombone: Benge 175F


  2. #2
    For me, that is a hard question to recommend one setup from the many possibilities. I personally would have no reservations using my own Adams E3 (Sterling Silver bell, 0.60 metal, gold brass on main bows, and yellow brass in and around valve section) in any playing environment or with any ensemble/group. I think my horn is well suited for solos and concert band work, however, I guess I would have to admit that I am not 100% sure about brass band, but I would sure make a go of it with what I had if I was playing in a brass band. I have experience in brass bands, but it was all on trombone, not euphonium. For brass band, I suppose you want a horn with a glorious sound and one that will blend well with your section mate and the band overall. The sterling silver bell may be something you could do without, and just select a gold brass bell and silver plate or lacquer the horn. I think generally the thicker the gauge of metal used, the darker the sound. So keep that in mind as you make a selection. And for sure you have to get custom inlaid valve buttons with some exotic wood or other material to make your fingers go faster than is humanly possible (I joke here!). But I love the look of Honduras Rosewood on my valve buttons!

    Not many Adams euphoniums in the UK Brass Band scene yet (this is my understanding at the moment), but I don't see why that can't change over time. They are great horns, and many of the world's finest are playing them.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Truro, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    For brass band, I suppose you want a horn with a glorious sound and one that will blend well with your section mate and the band overall..
    Well most players will go for the first bit and won't give a tinker's cuss about the rest! There is, unfortunately, a hideous trend for massive over-blowing especially amongst the very best players. As for the brand catching on - I fear it will be some time, for several reasons. Firstly the inate conservatism of the movement, secondly the enormous corporate aspect of contesting - Besson, Yamaha and Geneva have this sown up, and thirdly distribution. I used to work for a major Besson / Yamaha brass retailer and they don't stock Adams and I would hazard a guess that the margins available would dissuade them, despite even the quality of the product. I could however be talking complete hooey. The nearest supplier for me is 500+ miles away. (In the UK that's a long way, what with our skewed idea of distance....)

    If they blow like they look, I'd buy one, but then I don't suffer from tunnel vision, unlike many of my brass band contemporaries.
    1983 Boosey & Hawkes Sovereign
    Denis Wick SM4 (original series)

  4. #4
    I enjoy hearing your perspective, Simes. I wonder if it would raise eyebrows or be met with disdain if someone just showed up in their UK brass band with an Adams, which just replaced their long played Besson (or other typical brand). Probably another issue in having Adams a major part of the UK brass band scene or any other country's brass band scene, is that they are probably not being made yet in the numbers needed to become ubiquitous, and I suspect that might be a part of what you refer to as distribution, and that could be complete hooey, too.

    I kind of want Adams to go slow and steady rather than turn into a factory spewing out tons and tons of instruments so fast that quality and uniqueness and customization suffers.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  5. #5
    I wouldn't have any idea, but Matt van Emmerick (Adams Artist here in Australia) uses his Custom Adams for brass band work. Might be best to get David Werden's opinion on this matter.

  6. emailed Matt:

    He would recommend the following:
    E3
    0.6
    SS Bell
    Gold Brass body

    I'd say that's the same setup as you have John or am I wrong?
    Euphonium: Adams E3 Custom Series (SS Bell)
    Trombone: Benge 175F


  7. #7
    I'm not a brass band expert, although I have played in a couple USA versions, but I might offer the following.

    I like Matt's recommendation, and that is what I would choose for either brass band or wind band playing. But to some extent personal preference is involved. If you are a player who might otherwise choose a Prestige 2052, then Matt's setup is perfect. But if you like a somewhat more focused/direct sound, and might otherwise choose a Prestige 2051, then my setup might be better, which is the same except in the E1 setting.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DutchEupho View Post
    emailed Matt:

    He would recommend the following:
    E3
    0.6
    SS Bell
    Gold Brass body

    I'd say that's the same setup as you have John or am I wrong?
    That is not only the same setup (exactly), but we both have the same bell engraving (which although beautiful, is totally irrelevant to the horn's playing capabilities). I had a few conversations with Matt prior to placing the order for my E3. I really can't think of a playing situation where the Adams E3 with my configuration would not be an excellent choice. I would choose my current horn over any other for ANY group, ensemble or solo work. The sound is wonderful, and what group or soloist would not want that? I wish I had really good recording equipment, as I would like to post a video or two with the horn in action, but I can't seem to capture the sound of the horn very well with the gear I currently have. Maybe time to get some good stuff.
    John Morgan
    The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own) 1971-1976
    Adams E3 Custom Series Euphonium, Wessex EP-100 Dolce Euphonium, 1956 B&H Imperial Euphonium
    Adams TB1 Tenor Trombone, Yamaha YBL-822G Bass Trombone
    Wessex TE-360 Bombino Eb Tuba
    Rapid City New Horizons & Municipal Bands (Euphonium)
    Black Hills Symphony Orchestra (Bass Trombone), Powder River Symphony, Gillette, WY (Tenor Trombone)
    Black Hills Brass Quintet (Tuba)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Truro, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by John Morgan View Post
    I enjoy hearing your perspective, Simes. I wonder if it would raise eyebrows or be met with disdain if someone just showed up in their UK brass band with an Adams, which just replaced their long played Besson (or other typical brand). Probably another issue in having Adams a major part of the UK brass band scene or any other country's brass band scene, is that they are probably not being made yet in the numbers needed to become ubiquitous, and I suspect that might be a part of what you refer to as distribution, and that could be complete hooey, too.

    I kind of want Adams to go slow and steady rather than turn into a factory spewing out tons and tons of instruments so fast that quality and uniqueness and customization suffers.
    Thanks John. I suspect that anything new and different would be met with curiousity and interest. The players individually are keen on new things, but I remember having customers in trying both Yamaha Neo euphs and Prestige euphs, preferring almost everything about the Neo but at the last minute panicking and going for tradition in the shape of Besson. I may be speaking out of turn, and if I am I apologise, but there is it seems to me a sense of conceitedness and entitlement amongst many top players - who make a very good living out of an amateur pursuit - who wouldn't dare try something as radical as an entirely new concept of euphonium. There is an "old school" cartel of top players and conductors who have always sided with Besson and they exert an enormous influence and are quite happy for things to stay as they are to continue their livlihoods; this includes music from the select few composers they like, and instruments from the traditional company. A younger generation might very well provide a sense of curiosity that is currently sadly lacking.

    Personally I have only ever bought the best instrument for me, brand being irrelevant. I know that seems probably slightly ridiculous given my heritage of only playing B&H / Besson trumpets, but I would have no problem auditioning a Yamaha or an Adams, or perhaps a Miraphone or Hirsbrunner and making a purchase based on the response. That is one of the reasons I will be testing an Adams on my next trip to Scotland.

    As regards the quality issue, it seems similar to the problems Edwards faced when they first entered the brass band market - nobody had heard of them, therefore (in band thinking) they aren't much cop. Once the word circulated of their exemplary build the demand slowly grew. The advantage Adams have is their products are not massively more expensive than their rivals, unlike Edwards at the time. I suggest that ubiquity should never be a goal - Besson tried it with the "lottery era" instruments and the quality was abysmal.

    Brand inertia and general conservatism is damaging the brass band in the UK I am sorry to say. Sorry for the rambling and incoherent reply!
    1983 Boosey & Hawkes Sovereign
    Denis Wick SM4 (original series)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hidden Valley, AZ
    Posts
    762
    A sharp truth cuts deep...

    Dennis
    1966 Besson 181 highly modified New Standard
    1918 Hawkes & Son euph 3&1 original
    1915 York Bb tenorhorn original

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