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Thread: Eastman Euphonium

  1. #11
    I can confirm that it is a convertible euphonium and the extra piece is the leadpipe to change it to marching form.

    Found it on a Taiwan website. http://www.showmusic.com.tw/product.asp?c=58
    "Never over complicate things. Accept "bad" days. And always enjoy yourself when playing, love the sound we can make on our instruments (because that's why we all started playing the Euphonium)"

    Euphonium: JP 274 MKII, Yamaha EP100
    Mouthpiece: Denis Wick 5AL,Arnolds & sons 6 1/2 AL-B

  2. #12
    It should be worth noting that two former Adams artists are now Eastman artists, Matt van Emmerick and Brian Wilson - the new horn they are developing caused the switch I guess?
    Adams Selected E3 - 0.6, Yellow Brass Bell, Silver Plated
    K&G 3.5D

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by JakeGuilbo View Post
    It should be worth noting that two former Adams artists are now Eastman artists, Matt van Emmerick and Brian Wilson - the new horn they are developing caused the switch I guess?
    Perhaps that, plus the fact that Adams does not spend much on artists, and at some point(s) in one's career such funding may be necessary to "get around" as much as one might like. (Sterling lost a couple of artists in the same way, to a company with a higher budget for artist support.)

    I know Matt thought the prototype Eastman he had fit better with the orchestra, too.

    Note that I have not tried this model of Eastman so I can't say much about its qualities.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Perhaps that, plus the fact that Adams does not spend much on artists, and at some point(s) in one's career such funding may be necessary to "get around" as much as one might like. (Sterling lost a couple of artists in the same way, to a company with a higher budget for artist support.)

    I know Matt thought the prototype Eastman he had fit better with the orchestra, too.

    Note that I have not tried this model of Eastman so I can't say much about its qualities.
    I took a look at the Eastman website. They show a large bore size for the professional euphonium -
    • Three-valve top-action assembly through a .610 bore
    • Separate 4th valve assembly through a .630 bore

    That makes it comparable to the Miraphone 5050, and larger than the Adams.
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1, Kadja, and DE 101XTG9 mouthpieces
    Bach 36B trombone; pBone; Vincent Bach (from 1971) 6.5AL mouthpiece
    Steinway 1902 Model A, restored by AC Pianocraft in 1988; Kawai MP8, Yamaha KX-76
    See my avatar: Sherlock (the beige poodle-mix, RIP) had a 1-1/2-octave range in his singing voice, but preferred my piano playing.
    Jazz (the black cockapoo) loves the euphonium.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by dsurkin View Post
    I took a look at the Eastman website. They show a large bore size for the professional euphonium -
    • Three-valve top-action assembly through a .610” bore
    • Separate 4th valve assembly through a .630” bore

    That makes it comparable to the Miraphone 5050, and larger than the Adams.
    I'd forgotten that (short memory!). So that may bring the choice as a matter of personal taste to some extent, assuming the horn is made nicely. The 5050 is a dandy horn in so many ways, but for MY taste it was too large to carry off some of the lighter works. For example, I tried it on a Mendez solo and found it as easy to play as my own horn but lacking some of the "dance" quality I want from the piece. For something like the solo in the Holst 2nd it's wonderful!

    I heard a solo recently that Matt did on his Eastman. He sounded wonderful, of course, but a touch too dark for me (I don't often say that!). One can't judge by a single recording, though, because I have no idea what the acoustics of the venue were like.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

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