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Thread: Difference between Ultra Series mouthpieces?

  1. Difference between Ultra Series mouthpieces?

    What is the difference between SM4X, SM4U, SM4MU, and SM4MX? They all seem to have the same specifications.
    In general, what is the difference between the different Ultra Series mouthpieces for large shank Euphoniums?

  2. The M means medium shank. The U and X are pretty similar. I think the X is a little less deep and has a slightly sharper rim than the U.

  3. Agree with Daniel the X is a little less deep and has a slightly sharper rim than the U

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Truro, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    111
    I bought a 4X yesterday and even though I have only managed about three hours playing with it, would like to share some observations. My immediate reaction was that the rim seems a little more comfortable. Articulation seems a lot easier - intially I was really overdoing it but once I backed off a bit it seemed very responsive. The lower register seems slightly brighter and could generate undue edge without care. This ain't so good. I'm not worried about super register notes but from bottom C (TC) down is very important to me. Top A and Bb seem higher in pitch, which is good and top C / C# seem neither better nor worse, but as I loved them on this hooter anyway that's perfectly fine. Initial thoughts are positive.
    1983 Boosey & Hawkes Sovereign
    Denis Wick SM4 (original series)

  5. #5
    I love the SM4X. Additionally, this is an excellent bass trombone mouthpiece, when you have to play any solo. In bigband I play usually a Bach 1.5 G @ my besson bassbone, but the SM4X worked fine for my solo in the recent bigband concert.
    Jochen

    Boosey&Hawkes Imperial with SM4(U-X),
    YEP-321 with DW 4AY ...
    ... and my cello

  6. If anyone is interested, I have a SM4X in excellent condition which I would sell for $70, shipped (CONUS). PM me if interested.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Truro, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    111
    I have not long returned from a fairly heavy band practice using the SM4UX. I'm not in great touch but have recently been doing a decent amount of home practice, and for once doing the right stuff, rather than merely enjoying myself. However the meandering has a point - I have arrived at the conclusion that the 4X is a truly awful mouthpiece. No consistency of tone, and ghastly amounts of unwanted feedback through the instrument, as well as a total breakdown of sound at points, which extreme fatigue aside, I have never before experienced. the range involved of the pieces rehearsed is from bottom G to top Db (treble clef) but I seemed unable to centre anything. As I am guesting on solo euphonium it was both awkward and embarrassing. I do however now a dilemma - use the 4X for Sunday's gig or revert to my trusty battered 4AL?

    Getting back to the 4X - I cannot recommend it. It will be going on ebay very shortly.
    1983 Boosey & Hawkes Sovereign
    Denis Wick SM4 (original series)

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Simes View Post
    ...and ghastly amounts of unwanted feedback through the instrument
    Could you explain that in different words? I'm not sure what characteristic you are describing, but I would like to understand the usage. Thanks.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Truro, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    111
    Certainly, It's almost as if the venturi is too small, which is a nonsense as the backbore is bigger (I believe) than the 4AL. It is almost as if there was too much air going into the instrument, but given my build and lack of band practice is highly unlikely.
    1983 Boosey & Hawkes Sovereign
    Denis Wick SM4 (original series)

  10. #10
    Hmm. It MIGHT be one of those things you can adapt to, ultimately for a good effect. Or it could just be a bad cup shape for your embouchure, so that the air stream never gets properly formed for resonance.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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